logo Recapturing Cultural Identity Through Drumming and Drum Making: Drums of Humanity

Indonesia, Iraq, United States of America: Recapturing Cultural Identity Through Drumming and Drum Making: Drums of Humanity

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MUSIC FOR SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Botswana
PROJECT:
EMPOWERING AT-RISK YOUTH USINGWOSANA TRADITIONAL MUSIC

DESCRIPTION:
Wosana traditional music is mostly performed in the North Eastern District of Botswana by the Bakalanga people who are separated by geographic and political borders. This traditional music genre is used for cultural preservation as a unifying agent for both young and old people. Above all, this music is performed as a prayer for rain, a rare and much needed commodity in Botswana.

The goal of this project is to empower the youths who have dropped out of school by promoting the cultural heritage of wosana traditional music. It is believed that with the music skills acquired in this project, and in collaboration with the North East District Council authorities, these youth will be able to combat poverty.

Youth who take part in this project learn through apprenticeships:

  • performing skills
  • how to make traditional instruments, (including drums, leg rattles, hand rattles) and costumes and accessories (dancing sticks, beads for ornaments, skirts and blouses, etc.)
  • and acquire life skills, entrepreneurial skills, societal and moral values such as self-discipline and respect

CURRENT STATUS:
Performances were given in community cultural festivals and in schools for traditional music competitions. School dropouts throughout the North Eastern District of Botswana had shown interest in musical performances, but unfortunately the project is not currently running due to lack of resources and support.

However, the Botswana government is encouraging:

  • Both young and old in every tribe to revive their traditional musical ceremonies and values attached to them. This has been promoted through cultural festivals which have been scheduled as an annual event in May
  • Youth to find any form of entrepreneurial and self-empowering activities to alleviate unemployment – including skills such as building traditional instruments, costumes, etc.
  • That attract tourists – including performing in cultural festivals and competitions

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-07272005-111410/
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bakalang.htm

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: University of Botswana – Faculty of Education
Address: P/Bag UB 00702 - - Gaborone - Botswana
Phone: 3555098, Fax: 267 3185096
Contact Person: Dr. Otukile Sindiso Phibion
Email: phibion@mopipi.ub.bw


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Ghana
PROJECT:
DEVELOPING THE CREATIVE MUSICAL TALENT OF YOUTH: BLESS THE MIC

DESCRIPTION:
The BLESS THE MIC program provides a consistent avenue for emerging and established young artists to share their talents, hone their skills, and network with industry professionals. The program provides a platform for talented youths to demonstrate their skills and further develop their creative talent in music, poetry, traditional drumming and dancing.

Statistics show that 30 percent of the people in Ghana live under the country’s poverty line. The youth in Ghana represent a large proportion of those unemployed. This can promote criminal activities and the influx of youth into the cities. The main objective of the BLESS THE MIC project is to use the power of musical expression as a tool to empower young people through innovative and participatory programs. Articles 27 and 31 of the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child, state that children should be given the opportunity to express themselves and develop their creative minds. This is the platform that BLESS THE MIC stands on. Music is being used as the tool to unite youth enabling them to express their opinions while working towards a future career.

CURRENT STATUS:  
The BLESS THE MIC project is an ongoing project sponsored by Mi Prime Entertainment, an entertainment company that is committed to taking Ghanaian art to the global stage. Its mission is to promote art, music and culture based on a concrete Pan-African foundation. Over the past five years, some of the youth who participated in this program have become poets, musicians and dancers. The open-mic events, sponsored by BLESS THE MIC, are live musical programs that are quickly becoming one of Ghana's most popular activities.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.miprimeentertainment.com

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Bless the Mic
Address: #24 5th Circular Extension, Cantonments, Accra, Ghana
Phone: +233243281333
Contact Person: Papa Yaw Addo-Boateng Annan
Email: annan.papa@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa
PROJECT:
DEVELOPING LIFE SKILLS IN YOUTH THROUGH MUSIC FOR ERADICATING POVERTY AND PROMOTING DEVELOPMENT: FIELD BAND FOUNDATION

DESCRIPTION:
Based on the view that arts play a role in social inclusion and development for young people in South Africa, the Field Band Foundation (FBF) has identified its mission as: “Creating opportunities for developing life skills in youth through the medium of music and dance.” The Field Band concept is built on the global youth activity known otherwise as show bands, or drum and bugle corps. This discipline was chosen because of the long history of brass music in South African communities and its allowance for large group participation.  However, comprehensive HIV/Aids education is at the centre of the life skills programme. The discipline and focus that young people learn provide essential life skills, which will serve them well in any path they may take when they grow up. The Field Band Foundation brings this opportunity to all those young people who through poverty still suffer from the injustices of the past: those who need it the most. Field Band Foundation members from areas across South Africa work together at performances, workshops and competitions. This interaction helps build the nation as they learn understanding and respect for other cultures. Exchange programmes with Norway, Flanders, and the USA also provide opportunities to meet people from other countries, learn new skills and broaden perspectives.

The FBF was given the honour of playing a part in the 2010 FIFA World Cup celebrations. The FBF performed in the 100 and 50-day countdown celebrations and provided training for about 370 of their members to participate in the prestigious opening event. Another 60 Field Band members were also given the responsibility of leading performers from the rehearsal area to the stadium at the start of the proceedings on 11 June 2010. They also performed at the World Cup closing ceremony. This association with the 2010 FIFA World Cup will undoubtedly boost the confidence of these young men and women, forming a cherished memory never to be forgotten.

CURRENT STATUS:
Each of the current 17 projects, spread across the country, have a minimum of 125 youths actively involved. The goal is to involve 6,000 youths by 2012.

The FBF is fortunate to have a productive and close relationship with the Norwegian Band Foundation, whose steady commitment over the years has had a massive positive impact contributing to the overall growth of the organization and greatly enriching the experience and lives of the children. This association allows the FBF to undergo continuous external evaluation, helping in providing a constant challenge for us and a standard to live up to.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.fieldband.org.za/
http://www.musikkorps.no

Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjhUxwlmIng
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrsYLAuJ37A&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6s0ZKBG0Bjs

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Field Band Foundation
Phone: +27 31 564 2913 cell: +27 83 775 4348, Fax: +27 86 66 20345
Contact Person:  Retha Cilliers, Chief Executive Officer
Email: ceo@fieldband.org.za           

 


 SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa      
PROJECT:
MANGAUNG STRING PROGRAM FOR DISADVANTAGED YOUTH

DESCRIPTION:
The Mangaung String Program (MSP) is a string music development program initiated by the Free State Musicon in July 1997 which targets children from disadvantaged backgrounds in the greater Bloemfontein area, predominately Mangaung. There are four orchestras, based on ability, which all use the name Bochabela. There are currently over 430 pupils in the MSP.

In 2009, the MSP expanded the program to the rural southern Free State, two hours out of Bloemfontein. Once a week a senior instructor and three junior instructors travel to the towns of Phillipolis, Trompsberg and Springfontein in the Xhariep district. The program takes place at various primary and high schools during and after school hours. There are currently 100 pupils receiving tuition.

Due to the popularity of the program, older learners are employed to help teach the younger pupils. This has proven to be immensely successful. The younger children have a difficult concept explained in their mother tongue; they have a role model they can relate to. MSP gets excellent young teachers who grew up in the programme and understand the group and the cultural dynamics. Young teachers receive a substantial confidence boost, as well as a stipend to help them make ends meet. Two young musicians are also learning basic instrument and bow repairs.

The public face of the MSP is the Bochabela String Orchestra. This orchestra, made up of the best of the MSP, performs a wide variety of music from baroque to traditional and popular African music. The BSO performs for government, corporate and community functions. Many of these performances are a practical way to raise funds for pupils to attend music festivals, national orchestra courses, tours and orchestra camps.

The orchestra appears widely throughout South Africa including all national television stations. It performs in numerous music festivals including the Stellenbosch International Chamber Music Festival, the MIAGI Youth Orchestra course, and the South African National Youth Orchestra. The Bochabela String Orchestra has also appeared on Belgium and Austrian television.

CURRENT STATUS:
The MSP has recently completed its thirteenth year of existence. The programme is continuing to grow in the numbers of pupils (430), as well as the geographical reach expanding to Bloemfontein and the southern Free State. The Premier of the Free State, Ntate Ace Magashule, has requested that the progamme to reach out to underserviced areas in the northern Free State. This initiative is subject to the government providing adequate staffing to facilitate the Premier’s wishes.

While the provincial government of the Free State pays for two senior instructors, the University of the Free State also sponsors thirty-hours of specialized individual tuition. A link with the Free State Symphony Orchestra also makes it possible for the most advanced young pupils to also receive individual tuition. The Mangaung String Programme Trust and MIAGI provide modest stipends to our nine junior instructors.

The MSP has also received support over the past few years from the South African Music Rights Organization, MIAGI, the Community Services Department of the University of the Free State, the Belgian Youth Orchestra Violet, the Zaventum Schoolin in Belgium, the International School Brussels, Music in die Piano Forte in Austria,  Fractured Atlas in the USA and the FirstRand Foundation which gave us a grant to buy our thirty seat bus.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
A research study of the Mangaung String Programme, published in 2006 in the Journal of Musical Arts, focused on the details of its impact on the participants and their community. Drawing on qualitative methodology, surveys were conducted among the different community stakeholders involved in the programme. The interpretative tools applied to the data found that although both the learners and their community were at first unfamiliar with Western classical violin music, their 'horizon of expectations' gradually broadened, rendering them more open to cultural interchange. Also, the programme influenced those involved not only on a musical level, but also on various other socio-cultural levels.
 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.wix.com/mangaungstringprogr1/msp

Publications:
Elene Cloete. (2006). Broadening a horizon of expectations: A qualitative investigation of The Mangaung String Programme. Journal of Musical Arts in Africa, 3, 1, pp. 16-38.
http://www.channelmpr.co.za/index.php/news-room/49-music-makes-their-world-go-round

Photos: http://picturetank.com/___/series/7b367a331e658bb6bd40e21b735d88a6/en/a/SOUTH_AF

Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2J3XpdWoO0o
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NImx5nP1ZU&feature=player_embedded
For more videos, search “Bochabela String Orchestra” on YouTube.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Mangaung String Programme
16 Whites Road Waverley Bloemfontein 9301
Phone: (27) 083-703-1554, Fax: (27) 086-511-9781
Contact Person: Peter Guy
Email: pguy@mweb.co.za


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa
PROJECT:
MUSIC FOR RURAL DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN: THE KEISKAMMA MUSIC ACADEMY

DESCRIPTION:
The vision for the Keiskamma Music Academy is to uplift the quality of life of vulnerable rural children in the Eastern Cape Province of Hamburg and the surrounding areas by creating opportunities through a musical education. Hamburg is isolated, with few opportunities for youth. Many social problems such as teenage pregnancies, boredom, unemployment, alcoholism, HIV infection, and school dropout prevail. Without programs such as that of the Academy, the outlook for these youths is limited, their options are few, and the chances of them slipping through the cracks are enormous.

The Academy reaches 35 rural, vulnerable Xhosa children between the ages of 9 and 16. The program offers lessons on recorder (soprano, alto, tenor, bass and double bass recorders), marimba and orchestral instruments as well as music theory classes and ensemble opportunities.  Children attend several classes each week, enter examinations, and play in various concerts every year. The program follows a classical training approach and incorporates indigenous Xhosa instruments, marimba and djembe in performances, creating a unique sound voice. The opportunity to learn to play a musical instrument has huge long-term benefits. Together with the new skills students acquire, there is the empowering sense of fulfillment and achievement that comes with the creation of something beautiful.

Students are selected purely on their expression of interest. There is no other selection process. This makes it possible for a child to try out the program and decide for themselves whether they would like to continue. All lessons and materials are free for students. There are three rules for the children to follow in order to keep their position in the Music Academy: attend all lessons scheduled, take good care of their recorders and practice at home. The relationship with the parents and their pride and interest in their children’s success is one highlight of the program.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Keiskamma Trust (PBO: 930019627) is a registered charity with over ten years experience in the community. The Keiskamma Trust is a community organization, centered in Hamburg, a rural area of the Eastern Cape, South Africa, which works to foster hope and offer support for the most vulnerable. The Trust strives to address the challenges of widespread poverty and disease through holistic and creative programs and partnerships. The community trusts, supports and drives the work of the Trust, which gives the opportunity of music lessons immediate credibility. Initially there was not an expressed need by the community. Now, four years later, the community has reveled in the various successes of their children. Their pride in their children’s music making is tangible. Halls at concerts in Hamburg are now full.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Students play external examinations from the University of South Africa as a national benchmark. Concerts and participation in competitions further evaluate the work. The effectiveness of the program is seen in language skill development of all students: all lessons are conducted in English.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.keiskamma.org

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Keiskamma Music Academy
Address: P.O. Box 91095, Auckland Park, 2006, Physical: Plot 427, Hamburg Peddie 5641
Phone:  +27 82-664 1190
Contact Person: Helen Vosloo - Founder
E-mail: music@keiskamma.org


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa
PROJECT:
MUSIC INVESTMENT PROJECT FOR AT-RISK YOUTH: EASTERN CAPE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

DESCRIPTION:
In 2002, following a grant from the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund, the Eastern Cape Philharmonic Orchestra’s (ECPO) Music Investment Project (MIP) was founded. The main focus of this project is to offer children, through the power of music, alternatives to street life and crime and to open possibilities to escape a future of joblessness and poverty.
The goals of the MIP are:

  • Engage as many learners as possible from disadvantaged communities in a rich mix of musical experience
  • Create opportunities for the participants of the project to experience the world from a new perspective and offer an alternative to crime and a feeling of hopelessness
  • Creatively stimulate as many young township learners as possible, keep them meaningfully occupied and in the process develop life skills, confidence and leadership qualities
  • Take learners to the limit of their abilities by investing in a new generation of young musicians and audiences with an ongoing education programme in which we offer the exploration of a range of music-making activities and music appreciation
  • Extend the musical horizons of previously neglected music lovers, participating learners, their families and the community in which they live and thereby give them an equal opportunity to escape from the doldrums of township life and be exposed to quality performance opportunities
  • Grow a music programme to reflect the music diversity of our nation and ensure that traditional African and South African composed music takes its rightful place
  • Prepare young learners for possible careers in the music industry
  • Develop a sustainable music infrastructure on a long term basis
  • Grow the music capacity of music teachers and music learners in our region

The discipline, work ethic and vision shaped through musical training turns the learners into responsible, hard-working citizens. The project uses the school facilities of three schools in disadvantaged areas as teaching venues. Seven full-time and five part-time teachers are employed to teach almost 550 learners on recorders, orchestral instruments, and in choirs. Learners are entered for music exams with all the recognised examining bodies.

The project is not wholly focused on creating musicians, but on opening a variety of possibilities, which include opportunities throughout the whole music industry as well as service projects to the community. Families benefit by being part of their children’s development, growth and success and are provided with transport and tickets to ECPO concerts. The Project also reaches elderly, disabled and disadvantaged members of the community through ensemble concerts performed by members of the orchestra at institutions, schools and children’s homes.

The Youth Orchestra Experience (YOE), an annual course which takes place during the fall holidays, is run by the MIP to provide an opportunity for learners who do not have equal access to the South African National Youth Orchestra because of a lack of musical or financial resources.  This is, to our knowledge, the only provincial orchestra course in the country that serves as a learning experience to prepare learners for participation in the National Youth Orchestra and also serves as preparation to become a member of the ECPO. The YOE has taken place annually for the last eight years.  In this time it has improved the skills and experience of young musicians to a level where many have qualified for participation in and sponsorship for national courses and workshops.  Approximately 45 percent of the learners who qualify for the YOE are from disadvantaged communities, and have developed their skills through the MIP. YOE provides a learning opportunity to train future musicians for all genres of music. 

CURRENT STATUS:
The Eastern Cape Philharmonic Orchestra (ECPO) is a Section 21 company, managing a part-time orchestra.  In 2002, following a grant from the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund, the ECPO's Music Investment Project was founded. Costs associated with the venture include fees, flights and accommodation for orchestral instructors; food and refreshments for the learners attending; music hire, venue hire, transport, publicity and programs.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Questionnaires completed by the participants each year are analyzed, to ensure that high standards are maintained. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.ecpo.org.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4&Itemid=5
http://www.classicsa.co.za/site/features/view/ecpo_music_investment_project_offers_inspiration/

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Eastern Cape Philharmonic Orchestra Music Investment Project
Address: PO Box 12148, Moffat Place, 6002 Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Phone: +27 41 5817747, +27 82 2555194
Contact person: Judy Speyers, Manager
Email: ecpomip@iafrica.com


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health

clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa
PROJECT:
MUSIC WITH DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN SUFFERING TRAUMATIC EFFECTS OF THEIR ENVIRONMENT: MUSIC FOR LIFE PROJECT OF THE MUSIC THERAPY COMMUNITY CLINIC

 Please Refer to Section II, PAGE 78


 SECTIONS:
Music for Peacebuilding

clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa
PROJECT:
NTONGA MUSIC SCHOOL: PLAYING FOR CHANGE

DESCRIPTION:
“Playing for Change, Peace Through Music” is a multimedia movement created to inspire, connect, and bring peace to the world through music. The idea for this project arose from a common belief that music has the power to break down boundaries and overcome distances among people. No matter whether people come from different geographic, political, economic, spiritual or ideological backgrounds, music has the universal power to transcend and unite us as one human race. In 2007, the Playing For Change Foundation (PFCF) was created to support, through music, communities in need throughout the world.

PFCF has just opened the Ntonga Music School in Gugulethu, South Africa. Located outside of Cape Town, Gugulethu is a community in need of immediate assistance and inspiration. The school provides the children with valuable music skills development and mentorship designed to instill self-esteem and confidence. Working together with local residents, the Foundation is helping to create a safe, creative learning and sharing environment for children who will gain access to mentors and resources that were previously unavailable.
 
The new school and its social learning programs offer Guguletu’s youth an alternative to the violence and deprivation they face daily. In addition to building the school, the Foundation will be providing musical instruments, educational materials, and other necessities that this center requires. The school is led by a dedicated staff of music instructors and trained personnel who understand the unique challenges of their students. The school will not only empower the people of Guguletu to create positive opportunities for their community, but will also foster a greater connection to the rest of the world through the sharing of their music

CURRENT STATUS:
The Playing For Change Foundation (PFCF) is dedicated to connecting the world through music:

  • Building and connecting music schools around the world that provide hope and inspiration to communities in need
  • Providing a safe learning environment as an alternative to the violence and despair that these children face in their daily lives
  • Empowering children to create and share their music providing a healthy outlet for their personal expression
  • Promoting collaboration among students from our schools around the world.

Currently PFC sponsors seven projects around the world: Ntonga Music School in in Gugulethu, South Africa; Hari Kul Music School in Patan, Nepal; Bizung School Of Music And Dance in Tamale, Ghana; Ecole De Musique De Kirinin in Kirina Mali; Tintale Village Teaching Center in Tintale Village, Nepal; Matrata Nepal Music Program in Kathmandu, Nepal and Intore Culture & Music Center in Kigali, Rwanda.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.playingforchange.com/
http://playingforchange.org/

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Playing for Change, Peace through Music
Contact Persons: Mark Johnson, Co-Founder
Whitney Kroenke Burditt, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Playing For Change Foundation
Email: info@playingforchange.com, info@playingforchange.org


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa
PROJECT:
PRESERVING INDIGENOUS INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC AND DANCE PRACTICES OF AFRICA

DESCRIPTION:
The Center for Indigenous Instrumental Music and Dance Practices of Africa (CIIMDA), is a creativity- and performance-intensive education initiative funded by the Norwegian Foreign Office. In 2004, it was established in Pretoria. The purpose of CIIMDA is to infuse the humanizing principles of the indigenous philosophy of the musical arts into contemporary learning and activities through re-orientating and re-training school learners and teachers in African countries. Current classroom music education in contemporary African nations remains disproportionately foreign focused. Arts education design, curricular content and learning experiences thereby impact the cultural image and imagination of both trained teachers/educators and learners. CIIMD, an educational initiative, strives to restore African musical arts epistemology as an effective, scientifically underpinned, learning strategy to instill African culture through active, creative performance participation from an early age. Researched and indigenous African formulations combined with the objectives of the CIIMDA courses, children’s festival creations (recorded on DVD) and educational publications (13 books, plus articles), capture indigenous logic and grammar through:
•     Regenerating the spiritual being through constant participation, thereby stimulating mental health
•     Instilling humanity consciousness through structures that engender inter-personal bonding
•     Instilling psycho-physiological health through dance, such as feminine, maternity dance motions beginning in childhood, that strengthen the female body for child delivery or the muscle-massage dance styles that reduce stress and tension
•     Narrated and enacted folktale musical dramas that promote normative life virtues and ideal character attributes
•     Therapeutic theatrical enactment of societal experiences
•     Imparting multi-faceted life skills and a creative disposition through spiritually enriched play-mode
•     Experiencing the theory and science of knowledge fields; tempering of ego syndromes
•     Inclusive participation that eschews competition, discrimination and exclusion
•     Interacting with the different capabilities of the community/group in creative formulations and performances

Over 2,550 teachers/music educators/community art motivators and education advisers have attended CIIMDA Center and outreach courses. Some 9,626 learners and students have attended in-country workshops that showcased spontaneous group creativity performances. (DVDs of courses, creativity and concert performances are available)

In 2009, with the support of the Music Department, CIIMDA designed a Certificate in Africa Indigenous Cultural Arts Education (CAICAE) awarded by the Continuing Education Department of the University of Pretoria to teachers/educators from participating African countries (the syllabus is available).

In 2010, stemming from over 30 years of research in indigenous epistemology, resources and creative principles, CIIMDA designed a three-tier culture-sensitive, African Musical Arts Education curricula for primary education in Africa (information available). The curricula have been endorsed by the Pan-African Musical Arts Educators, and have been adopted by the Department of Education of South Africa.

CURRENT STATUS:
We are embarking on the training of skilled manpower for the South African Government as a sustainability initiative.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:

  • Embodied in description above, (DVD’s, publications, school performances, festivals)
  • Evaluation of the impact of the CIIMDA programme, carried out by Dr. Masoga Mogomme, in 2007, and sponsored by the Norwegian Foreign Office

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.ciimda.org

Publications:
Learning the musical arts in contemporary Africa Vols.1 & 2 for Primary education. (2005).
A comprehensive study of musical arts Vols. 1-4 for secondary/tertiary education. (2007).
Theory and practice of modern African classical drum music and drummistic piano Vols. 1-3 (with expository text). (2007).
African classical concert ensemble music Vols. 1-3 (Drum-based with expository text) 2009.
African indigenous knowledge-sensed musical arts education - policy considerations. (2009).

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Center for Indigenous Instrumental Music and Dance Practices of Africa Education Research & Performance (CIIMDA)
Address: 64, 14 Street, Menlo Park, Pretoria, South Africa
Phone: +27 12 460 4839, Cell +27 74 196 0810, Fax: +27 12 460 4800
Contact Person: O’Dyke Nzewi, Education & Research Manager
Email: info@ciimda.org, odyke.nzewi@ciimda.org


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Brazil
PROJECT:
BRINGING MUSIC TO CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS IN SITUATIONS OF SOCIAL VULNERABILITY: INTERMUSIC

DESCRIPTION:
Since 2007 the InterMusic project, in partnership with the Guitarríssima Music, has served people of all age groups who are socially and economically vulnerable. All activities are permeated by seven human values that are at the center of its pedagogical proposal: respect, autonomy, democracy, cooperation, creativity, innovation and responsibility. Participants have the opportunity to develop musical capacities that vary from building their own instruments - using recycled materials - to learning about musical content such as timbre, harmony, melody, form and expressive character.  Using an integrative model, where personal musical interactions are magnified by a web-based resource center, InterMusic has several cultural as well as musical aims:

  • To create a time for self-expression and creativity
  • To enhance the local cultural heritage
  • To see music as a tool for social integration
  • To assist in the construction of personal identity, personal values and self-esteem of each     participant
  • To socialize and promote tolerance among different cultures
  • To develop musical skills that enhance other areas of life of participants

 

Beyond a model of lesson delivery, InterMusic focuses on creative educational opportunities where music can become a social and economic resource in the lives of youth. In order to accomplish this, students compose and perform pieces made with recycled and conventional instruments. They learn techniques implementing conventional and alternative instruments and prepare musical performances at Sport Club Internacional and Guitarríssima Music School.

CURRENT STATUS:
The project is ongoing and provides weekly lessons and musical engagements. This musico-cultural project was developed in conjunction with Sport Club Internacional, one of the largest soccer teams in Brazil. As such, the program is sustainable through strong partnership with a committed institution creating the likelihood of growth and the continuation of this enterprise.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.guitarrissima.com.br
www.internacional.com.br

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Guitarrissima Music School                             
Phone: +55 51 3022.3357
Contact Person: Allan César Pfützenreuter, Director
Email: contato@guitarrissima.com.br


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Brazil
PROJECT:
THE HUMAN BODY AS AN INSTRUMENT:  PROJECT BATUCADEIROS

DESCRIPTION:
Since 2001, the Batucadeiros Project has been addressing the needs of the underserved and vulnerable populations in Recanto das Emas, a town in the periphery of Brasilia. By developing a methodology that promotes inclusion through socio-cultural access to music from the use of the human body as a musical instrument, the Project Batucadeiros offers a solution to quality musical engagement where the difficulty of acquiring musical instruments, especially in disadvantaged segments of the population, is evident. By eliminating the cost of expensive tools and materials, we have created musical learning with a wide power range. The exploration of multiple genres, musical rhythms, improvisation and aural acuity are at the center of the pedagogical goals. Musical pieces are composed collectively out of the musical knowledge that participants bring to the meeting space. As a set of collectively invented ‘repertoire’ was developed, the project received invitations for presentations and workshops and are now part of the structure of the project. As a consequence, a process for the formation of ‘Multiplicadores’—young participants that take on the role of leaders and pedagogues—was also developed.

The project’s aims include:

  • Improving literacy by increasing school attendance
  • Expanding the age range of participants served to include younger children
  • Launching a broader community initiative toward interactive learning and the development of school-support systems within the community
  • Creating partnerships with government and private companies such as Laboratory Sabin              and Brazil Telecom that support internships for mentors that lead toward entrance into college programs

CURRENT STATUS:
Over the years, Projeto Batucadeiros has raised resources from the government, private companies, individuals, presentations and from body percussion workshops. In 2010 the program was selected to work in partnership with an Entrepreneurship Incubator Project developed by the University of Brasilia.  The program focuses on judicial, marketing and pedagogical aspect for Non-Governmental Organization development.

Currently, the project serves 90 children and adolescents. From the Project Batucadeiros Multiplicadores (Multipliers), we have more than 120 students who are served, once a week, in communities of vulnerable populations in Distrito Federal (Brasília). Along with the training in body percussion, the project will create a symphony orchestra with the children and the adolescents: “Batucadeiros Growing With Music.” We have established a partnership with the University of Brasilia on two fronts: the Decanate of Extension and Art and the Culture-Incubator-Support Centre for Technology Development. The goal is to link the project with the knowledge developed by the University (teaching, research, extension) for the improvement of actions that generate a positive impact on local society through music as an instrument of social transformation.

 

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
The program uses an array of procedural and other assessment matrixes for evaluating results. Thus, the development of specific goals is monitored through evaluation questions. The indicators for the evaluation of the results are: frequency and student achievement in the activities offered, motivation of teachers, family relationships, school performance, interpersonal relationships within the family project and interest in the schooling of their children. From these evaluations forms, we collect data, diagnose situations and elaborate directions.

During this process, we began to investigate the possible causes of the problems our young people encounter in schools, particularly in terms of a perceived large gap in literacy capacity, accounting for numerous cases of so-called functional illiterates. Therefore, participation in the Batucadeiros Project became contingent upon school attendance which, according to recent surveys has had a positive impact on school attendance for those enrolled, increasing attendance up to two more days per week. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.institutobatucar.org.br

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Instituto Batucar
Address: Rua 14 Norte lt 3 ap 1005/ Águas Claras – DF/ Brazil
Phone: (61) 8419-9675/8419-9674/3435-2241
Contact Person: Ricardo Amorim
Email: musicvida@hotmail.com.br.


SECTION: 
Music for Sustainable Community Development

clefCOUNTRY:
Colombia
PROJECT:
LET THE MUSIC TOUCH YOU: FUNDACIÓN NACIONAL BATUTA

DESCRIPTION:
Fundación Nacional Batuta, a public/private foundation, was created in 1991 by a joint effort between the national government of Colombia and the private sector. Its programs were modeled, in part, on the National Youth & Children Symphonic Orchestras Organization of Venezuela (“El Sistema”). Over the years, Batuta has expanded the scope of its operations to better meet the needs of the large and diverse population it serves. The principles upon which Batuta structures its programs are:

  • The transformative power of music
  • The social values of group music education
  • Music education has a highly beneficial impact on human beings 
  • Teaching music to children also impacts their families and communities

Batuta has many diverse programs including pre-orchestras, a symphonic orchestra and music education for children and teenagers with disabilities. Many of the children have suffered directly from forced displacement associated with violence. In 2010, 22,100 displaced children were a part of nearly 800 “pre-orchestras,” and vocal-instrumental ensembles designed to develop basic musicianship. Also, 11,067 of the children served by Batuta belong to families from extreme poverty and have two or more of their basic needs unsatisfied (health, education, employment of their parents, shelter, nutrition, etc.). These conditions affect children’s physical and emotional development and, as a consequence, their academic performance. Batuta is a safe space, where students can be protected from risks in their environments, and practice values such as respect, tolerance, and team work. Students learn how to be positive leaders within their communities.

The pre-orchestra program is the largest. It has an inclusive philosophy that does not require students to have any prior musical knowledge. There are no admission examinations and no other admissions criteria such as demonstrating musical skills. The program works essentially with Colombian popular music but also includes other Latin American music. Students are automatically promoted to the next level. The program instruction is collective; there is no individual instruction. This is important to achieve Batuta’s psycho-social objectives.

The symphonic orchestra program performs both a Western classical and a Columbian repertoire and has recently completed its first European tour. The music education program for youngsters with disabilities is the only large program of its kind in the country and serves over 600 children.

There are 300 music educators in the program. Not all teachers have university degrees. Self-taught musicians who are recognized within their communities work for Batuta. Their knowledge of traditional regional music is an important component of the programs. Batuta organizes professional training workshops for music instructors, conductors and musical instrument technical experts from throughout Columbia to improve music education. It has produced didactic materials such as books, scores, and audio materials.

 CURRENT STATUS:
Batuta is now one of the largest arts programs of any kind in Latin America, and is the largest in Colombia. It has gained international attention. Currently it has centers in all 32 departments (states) of the country, serving over 40,000 children and adolescents in 2010. It is expected that in 2011, the numbers will be maintained. More than 1400 concerts have taken place, where students had an opportunity to show their abilities and the work of Batuta. Some of the activities included participation of some students in the International Hey Mozart Festival, the creation of the Young Colombia Philharmonic Orchestra in alliance with Fundación Bolivar, Davivienda and the YOA Orquesta de las Américas.

Batuta is supported by state agencies, city offices, foundations, and corporations. The national scope and success of Batuta’s work has been achieved through the generous voluntary assistance of organizations and institutes such as, Ecopetrol, the Fundación Panamericana para el Desarrollo (FUPAD), the Fondo para la Acción Ambiental y la Niñez, ACESCO, Plan International Inc, the Municipality of the Capital District and various other cities, along with many smaller organizations. The organization is always looking for more resources to increase the program and ensure more programs for students throughout the country.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
There have been two evaluations documenting the effectiveness of the program. Both evaluated the pre-orchestra program supported by Acción Social (a State Agency). The evaluations were funded by the National Department of Planning in the Public Policy Evaluation Unit (SINERGIA).

1. CRECE (Centro de Estudios Regionales, Cafeteros y Empresariales): A qualitative evaluation of the Project “Music Education for Children and Youngsters: Let the Music Touch You,” developed by Fundación Nacional Batuta and Acción Social (2008).This qualitative study evaluated the effects of the pre-orchestra program on the participant children and teenagers, with regards to the impact of the music program on twelve psychosocial factors affecting individual, family, school and community. The most relevant findings were an increased sense of responsibility, better use of free time, stronger values for coexistence, wider social networks, and a sense of happiness due to being part of the program.

2. Economía Urbana: Evaluation of the Process of Musical Education and Its Impact on the Academic Performance of the Pre-Orchestral Project of Batuta (2010). This statistical model was designed to measure the impact of the Project and revealed a high degree of success for all aspects of the program studied. The results should be made public by the end of 2011. From the perspective of its social impact, the study demonstrated that the program has significant impact on resilience, leadership and self esteem, and a direct influence in academic improvement of the participants in their school work. Cognitive impact was measured as well, finding important results in meta-linguistic and space skills. According to the study, the program has demonstrated its efficacy in helping children and their communities to overcome problems of conflict and displacement. Recommendations included adding a creative dimension to the curriculum and begin teaching music reading and writing early in the program through didactic practices in order to give stronger support to students in learning and psycho-social processes.

Currently, there is a 4-year research project (2011-2014) “Alondras y Ruiseñores ”: Musical Intelligence as an Alternative of Multidimensional Education for First Childhood (Batuta, Universidad Distrital, COLCIENCIAS) being financed by the National Department of Science and Technology.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.fundacionbatuta.org

Press releases:
http://fundacionbatuta.org/index.php?page=2&site=1&idFile=123&idFile=123&restrict=&idMap=6
http://www.eltiempo.com/entretenimiento/musica/orquestas-infantiles-y-juveniles-_9987668-4

Photographs:
http://fundacionbatuta.org/index.php?page=11&site=1&idFile=115&idFile=115&restrict=&idMap=5

Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/Batutaprensa

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Fundación Nacional Batuta           
Address: Calle 9 No. 8-97, Bogotá D.C., Colombia
Phone: (571) 333-6765; 333-6768 ext. 105, Cell (57) 310-575-3959
            Fax: (571) 333-1260
Contact person: Juan Antonio Cuéllar, Executive President
Email: juanantoniocuellar@fundacionbatuta.org or batuta@fundacionbatuta.org


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY: 
Ecuador

PROJECT:
EMPOWERING AT-RISK YOUTH TO ACCESS THEIR CREATIVITY AND BUILD SELF-ESTEEM THROUGH MUSIC AND THE ARTS: PROJECT CREO

DESCRIPTION:
Project Creo (yo creo translates to English as “I Create” and “I Believe”) empowers at-risk youth to access their creativity and build self-esteem through multi-disciplinary arts programming.
Based in Quito and in development since 2008, Project Creo is building its program locally, linking local teaching artists to local disadvantaged youth in local spaces. This initiative is part of the US not-for-profit organization, Arts InterFACE whose mission is to foster charitable exchange by facilitating international arts projects. 

Founded on the principle that to create is to believe in oneself, Project Creo is implementing these ideals through the following objectives:

  • To engage innate creativity through music and art-making (music composition, original theater creation, dance, and visual arts)
  • To fortify high self-esteem and sense of self-worth in the individual
  • To develop global citizens who think and respond to the world’s challenges with creative ideas and compassionate action

To achieve these objectives, Arts InterFACE has partnered with the Ecuadorian foundation CRISFE to develop programming through a facility in Quito built specifically for arts education. Programming incorporates concepts from the Metropolitan Opera Guild and City University of New York’s Creative Arts Team and engages at-risk youth in music and storytelling. During this experience, individuals compose original songs and music, perform these compositions for others through singing and playing and share these narratives within a music drama format that utilizes theater, movement and the visual arts.  

Three branches of year-round programming are offered at the Quito facility:
1) Weekly classes for at-risk youth engaging them in the creation of music, theater, movement, and visual arts, and the sharing of those creations locally and internationally with other youth from around the world
2) Professional development workshops for local teachers to increase the implementation of arts education in the public school classroom
3) Specialized parent and family workshops which artistically explore local social issues through creative, solution-oriented dialogue

CURRENT STATUS:
Project Creo is being offered at the pilot facility in Quito with the intention of eventual implementation in 18 other facilities throughout the country. Partnerships with the Metropolitan Opera Guild, City University of New York’s Creative Arts Team, and international professional teaching artists have resulted in an international exchange to explore how creativity can be engaged for positive change. Project Creo and Arts InterFACE are currently funded through a partnership with the Ecuadorian foundation, CRISFE. Additional funding from grants, corporate sponsors, and private donors are needed in order to develop an international network of artists and experts as a resource for local teachers who are executing the programming as well as for general programming costs.
Other Arts InterFACE Developments:
The Tsachila Project (Ecuador, USA)
The Tsachila Project connects the musical traditions of the Ecuadorian Tsachila community with the rest of the world through choral arrangements and education. In development since 2008, the Tsachila Project began when the Tsachila indigenous community shared their traditional melodies and musical culture with the founder of Arts InterFACE. From this experience, a choral piece based on traditional Tsachila melodies was composed in honor of the community. After a series of premieres across the United States, Cancion de Los Tsachilas was published with Alliance Music Publications. Proceeds from the publication are donated by Arts InterFACE to promote and preserve the Tsachila community and culture.

Arts InterFACE is currently providing workshops in classrooms and other educational settings to foster awareness of Tsachila culture and what can be learned from their musical traditions. Workshops have been provided to schools, universities, and community groups throughout the United States.  Arts InterFACE is also arranging international performances for Tsachila musicians in order to promote the funding and publication of a Tsachila book on the natural resource of local plant life.

MusicinterFACE (USA)
MusicinterFACE is an emerging initiative that seeks to offer community organizations and institutions dynamic music programming.  It is currently developing four programs with United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) of New York City, including music therapy services, music education and special composition projects. 
                                                                                                                                                           
RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
One of Project Creo’s long-term goals is to expand into other countries, thereby developing an international network of arts facilities that can explore social issues creatively and dynamically. For this reason, Project Creo is implementing systematic documentation and assessment tools for research as it progresses. This information is then shared with the project’s partners, allowing for continuous evaluation and assessment for growth and improvement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.projectcreo.com
www.artsinterfacenow.org
www.metguild.org
www.crisfe.org
 
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Arts InterFACE
Address: P.O. Box 24465, Tempe, AZ 84465 USA
Phone:  480-227-6389
Contact Person: Michael Sample, Founder
Email:  info@artsinterfacenow.org


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefCOUNTRY:
Mexico

PROJECT:
PROVIDING MUSIC EDUCATION TO STUDENTS IN DIVERSE SETTINGS AND INSTITUTIONS: MUSIC AND CULTURE AT CEDROS

 Please Refer to SECTION IV, PAGE 166


 SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development 
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
MUSIC FOR ECONOMICALLY DISENFRANCHISED YOUTH AND THEIR
FAMILIES:  YOUTH ORCHESTRA OF LOS ANGELES

DESCRIPTION:
Youth Orchestra L.A. (YOLA) is the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s initiative to bring free, intensive after-school music instruction to children in underserved communities. YOLA is inspired by El Sistema, Venezuela’s revolutionary youth orchestra movement. YOLA aims to act as an agent of social change by providing economically disenfranchised youth with the developmental, social and academic advantages that can be gained through the study of music. Music is used as an agent of social development because it transmits the highest values of any community – solidarity, harmony, and mutual compassion. YOLA also functions as a broader community engagement initiative, providing families with opportunities for music making while supporting their children’s development.

Currently, YOLA consists of three community-based programs:

  • YOLA at EXPO, located in South L.A., serves students ages two to seventeen who participate in one of two beginning-level orchestras, chamber music, and group lessons up to 10 hours per week. The program began in 2007 and also includes an early childhood music program developed in collaboration with USC’s Thornton School of Music, parent workshops, a recorder ensemble and a faculty performance series. YOLA at EXPO is a partnership of the LA Philharmonic Orchestra, the Harmony Project, and the EXPO Center, a City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks Facility.
  • YOLA at HOLA, located in the Rampart District of LA, offers elementary and middle school students a uniquely intensive learning experience. For up to 15 hours per week, participants are immersed in instrument instruction, singing/solfège, musicianship, ensembles, and daily academic tutoring. The program was launched in 2010 and also offers parent musicianship class and access to exceptional social services. YOLA at HOLA is a partnership between LA Philharmonic Orchestra and the Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA) Community Center.
  • In 2011, YOLA piloted its newest program, the YOLA Neighborhood Project (YNP). Inspired by the Harlem Children’s Zone, YNP is an in-depth initiative aimed at building healthy communities in the two neighborhoods in which YOLA is currently situated. Through LA Philharmonic Orchestra’s school programs, neighborhood concerts, and YOLA, YNP offers youth, families, and the community at large multiple entry points and opportunities to experience the world of music.

CURRENT STATUS:
Support for YOLA is provided by a combination of individuals, foundations, and corporations. The Board of the LA Philharmonic Orchestra is committed to YOLA for the long-term. Its program costs have become part of the institution’s annual operating budget. Moreover, to make this type of work sustainable, the LA Philharmonic Orchestra splits program costs with each of the YOLA site’s community partners. YOLA is also supported by a group of over fifty public and private music education and social service organizations who are invested in YOLA’s mission. While this group does not provide monetary assistance, the YOLA Stakeholder Network convenes four times each year to think collaboratively about developing new orchestras for
underserved youth, pool resources to improve existing programs, and share achievements and best practices.

The LA Philharmonic Orchestra’s work through YOLA has proven that this educational model can have a dramatic impact in a short period of time. Four years after the program began, enrollment rose from 40 to 500 (with a wait list topping 100-plus interested students). YOLA is having a great impact on communities it serves and the greater Los Angeles County. In October 2009, 18,000 people witnessed the LA Phil at the Hollywood Bowl – with the youth orchestra from YOLA at EXPO. Since that time, the young musicians of YOLA have had unparalleled performance opportunities, playing on the stage of Walt Disney Concert Hall, appearing on national television, and collaborating with world-famous musicians.

Recognizing the need to disseminate best practices, the LA Phil developed an online resource library, a compilation of tips and guides for individuals interested in starting their own El Sistema-inspired programs. In addition, YOLA has been featured at the National Guild of Community Schools of the Arts and the Association of California Symphony Orchestra conferences. It served as a case study for representatives from 27 states and 6 countries during the first YOLA Symposium in 2010.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Program assessment focuses on five key areas:  student success, teacher effectiveness, family impact, community awareness and institutional learning. Outcomes for the YOLA at EXPO program are measured in an Efforts-to-Outcomes database. This database captures longitudinal data, including attendance, musical progress, and demographics.

Student success is measured by semi-annual juries / recitals, attendance, and report cards. Teachers are given observations and feedback, and parents receive an annual survey. Parents annually receive pre- and post- surveys. Institutional learning is measured through the Co-Arts Assessment protocol - an assessment tool designed by researchers at Harvard’s Project Zero to capture progress made by arts education programs run out of community centers.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.laphil.org/yola

Publications:
www.laphil.com/yola/yola-resource.cfm

Photos and Videos:
www.laphil.com/yola/media-library
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UqYX1FadBLY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBd4-3UlltQ

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Los Angeles Philharmonic Association
Address: 151 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90012
Contact Person: Gretchen Nielsen, Director of Educational Initiatives
Email: gnielsen@laphil.org


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
PROMOTING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN INMATES AND THE COMMUNITY: CHORAL SINGING AND SONGWRITING

DESCRIPTION:
This project works to bridge gaps in the justice system through music making. These gaps may be evident in strained and distrustful social relationships among prisoners or in the outside community’s general lack of awareness of prisoners as individuals. Administered by the University of Iowa, community members (“outside” singers) come into the prison each Tuesday evening to rehearse with prisoners (“inside” singers) to form the full choir. Two themed concerts are performed in the prison each choral season. 

In addition to singing and performing together, the choir members participate in writing and songwriting activities. The writing component serves as a bridge between inside and outside members. Choristers have written five songs that have been performed in the concerts (“Crossroads,” “In My Mother’s Eyes,” “Left Behind,” “No Days Like the Holidays,” and “May the Stars Remember Your Name”). Although the lyrics of these songs are the lyricists’ creations, other choir members relate to their meaning. For example, the lyricist of “In My Mother’s Eyes” reflects on his last interaction with his mother in the courtroom when he was sentenced to prison. These songs provide a means for self-expression and reflection on past and present life situations.

The University of Iowa and the Iowa Department of Corrections have had various partnerships over the last 25 years. This present initiative, the Oakdale Community Choir (OCC), began in February 2009 as a collaboration between the University of Iowa and the Iowa Medical and Classification Center (IMCC) known as Oakdale Prison. The goals of this university-prison collaboration include the following:

  • To embrace the joys of our hard work for a meaningful purpose, which in turn inspires motivation to participate in new endeavors
  • To build companionship rooted in our sharing and responding to others
  • To gain confidence that each one of us can contribute to a greater good both individually and collectively
  • To learn to accept who we are as individuals and as a community
  • To develop particular skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, social networking, and creative expression.

Participants in the choir include (a) general population male offenders who are not restricted to their units at IMCC and (b) female and male community volunteers who have an interest in learning more about the prison system and being actively involved in prison education. These individuals are Iowa University students, faculty, staff, and other people in the community. Audience members at our performances include offenders at IMCC; staff and administration at IMCC; family members and friends of choir members; faculty members, staff, and students from the University of Iowa; crime victims; and others in the community.

CURRENT STATUS:
The choir rehearses and performs each fall and spring academic semester. In the summer inside members participate in a songwriting class. At the present time members of the of the choral group are preparing their first official publication, a CD of original songs and an anthology of original writing. Proceeds from the sale of these items will be used for crime victims, charities of the prisoners’ choices, and for funding the education program.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.uiowa.edu/~fyi/issues/issues2008_v45/04132009/photos/OakdaleCommunityChoir/i
dex.html
http://www.doc.state.ia.us/TrainingCenter/Newsletters/Journey-Winter2009.pdf

Publications:
Iowa Department of Corrections Victim and Restorative Justice Center Newsletter “The
Journey,” see article on pages 6-7.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Orgainzation: The University of  Iowa
Address: 305S Communications Center, Iowa City, IA 52242-1795
Phone: 319-335-3030, Fax: 319-335-5608
Contact Person: Mary L. Cohen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music Education
Email: mary-cohen@uiowa.edu


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
PROMOTING RESILIENCY AND POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT WITH AT-RISK STUDENTS: MARIACHI PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION:
There are obviously great needs among the school children in the US, particularly those categorized as at-risk. Fifty-four percent of students in K-12, Texas public schools, who have been identified as “at-risk,” are primarily Hispanic. One strategy for reaching these students is using a music program centered around Positive Youth Development based on the principles of authentic community engagement, cultural competence, and an ethics of caring.

Since 2003, Mariachi Águilas, an ensemble for undergraduate and graduate students at the University of North Texas, has been creating relationships with local middle and high school students in public school mariachi programs. This ensemble learns and performs culturally appropriate music at a high-level, performing for UNT functions, community events, and private functions. Several of the members have been teaching in after-school mariachi programs in middle and high schools in the North Texas area. These students have been trained as culturally aware music educators. In addition, UNT offers a Summer Mariachi Camp in which these predominantly at-risk Hispanic public school students come to campus, stay in the dorms for four nights, attend mariachi workshops all day, visit the recreation center, planetarium, and other University centers, and perform in a concert at the Performing Arts Center.

The guiding framework of this program is building trusting relationships and the necessity for reciprocity in which all participants are valued.

The mariachi program promotes community engagement as a process that contains elements of shared benefits and reciprocity in which all parties learn from each other. By realizing that music making and all interactions are meaningful within specific social and cultural contexts, this perspective differs considerably from “outreach.” As such the program improves community members’ self-worth by valuing the cultures they bring with them and promotes opportunities for collaboration among the community, UNT students and faculty.

Goals include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Improving school attendance, retention rates, academic performance, graduation rates and college attendance among at-risk students
  • Providing opportunities for improved self-esteem, resiliency, self-worth, self-expression, and discovery of individual competencies
  • Making better connections between UNT and the local community, by reaching out to populations that are typically not interactive with the university
  • To better prepare undergraduates to work more effectively with culturally diverse populations

CURRENT STATUS:
Mariachi Aguilas is a well-established ensemble in one of the largest university music programs in the country. It has established strong relationships with local public schools. In summer, 2010, they are offering our third summer mariachi camp and attendance is expected to double. In addition, for the first time graduating high school seniors have applied for admission to UNT. These students will be the first in their families to attend college or university. UNT is working to develop a study abroad experience in Guadalajara, Mexico to experience mariachi in its original cultural context. Graduates from UNT who have been members of Mariachi Águilas are currently teaching music in local schools and starting new mariachi programs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.unt.edu/northtexan/fall2008/media/0809_NTxn_Mariachi/0809_NTxn_Mariachi.htm

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Mariachi Águilas
Address: University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Phone: 940-369-7973
Contact Person: Dr. Donna T. Emmanuel, Founder and Sponsor
Email: donna.emmanuel@unt.edu

SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
REACHING UNDERSERVED YOUTH THROUGH AFTER SCHOOL MUSIC CLUBHOUSE PROGRAMS

DESCRIPTION:
The Music and Youth Initiative partners with community-based organizations to form strong youth development programs in music. They provide financial, program and operational support for after school music programs for underserved teens. These music clubs engage at-risk youths by promoting learning and social interaction. Cooperation and teamwork are emphasized while participants gain operational knowledge of musical instruments and music technology. Youth are empowered through their involvement in recording studios, bands and music workshops. They take part in an environment where exemplary models of learning how to work together are taught. Formal lessons in contemporary guitar, keyboards, bass, drums and music recording are being offered.

Currently the Music and Youth Initiative serves communities in nine locations – six in Boston and three in neighboring cities in Eastern Massachusetts. Collectively, the “Music Clubhouse” and “Studio Clubhouse” programs receive over 1,500 youth visits a week with over 500 students enrolled.

CURRENT STATUS:
Music & Youth Initiative is a U.S. 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with 70% of its funding coming from individual donors and the remaining 30% from foundations and corporations.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Success is measured by the number of youth being served, the numbers enrolled in formal music lessons and the percent of students who achieve the ability to perform. Each club reports three times a year to the central Music and Youth Initiative about their program attendance, as well as offering “impact stories” describing how individual involvement has affected the lives of its members.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.musicandyouth.org/

Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TB-AMIfy18o
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNFRozxTn5M&feature=related

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Music and Youth Initiative
Address: 398 Columbus Avenue #307, Boston MA 02116
Phone: 508-353-4714
Contact Person: Gary Eichhorn, Executive Director
E-mail: Gary.eichhorn@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
SONGWRITING WITH AT-RISK YOUTH: HEAR OUR VOICES

DESCRIPTION:
“Hear Our Voices” is an innovative music therapy project aimed at promoting healthy attitudes and behaviors in at-risk youth through the use of a structured songwriting program. The project is an outreach program of The Arts and Quality of Life Research Center of the Boyer College of Music and Dance at Temple University. This program began in 2007 at the Hancock St. John (H& S) Learning Center in the Kensington South area of Philadelphia, where it continues at present. Elementary school children living in this neighborhood are exposed to serious social problems, such as poverty, crime and violence. The songwriting program provides fourteen weeks of sessions each cycle, using a theme-centered approach aimed at providing the children with a creative outlet for exploration and expression of issues relevant to their lives (violence, difficult family situations, drug use, anger management, school, and peer pressure) and an opportunity to collaboratively create strategies for personal safety and success. The programs are run by Board-certified music therapists. The songwriting cycle culminates in the production of a CD of the children’s work and a CD release party organized in the community. The act of public sharing of the songs instills feelings of hope and a need for change within the community. Subsequent cycles at each site involve new groups of children in different age groups, ranging from kindergarten through 8th grade.

In 2009 “Hear Our Voices” expanded to Carson Valley Children’s Aid, which provides educational, behavioral, and psychological services to children with psychiatric and behavioral disorders due to trauma. Carson Valley has since adopted the program into its curriculum, while the Arts and Quality of Life Research Center continues to collect data on its effectiveness at the site. Additionally, a Temple University grant in 2010 funded individual songwriting sessions for Carson Valley students. The program also expanded in 2010 to the Drueding Center in Kensington, which serves homeless families who also are often victims of abuse. All Saints Episcopal Church in Collingdale, PA began hosting the program in 2011 as well, serving a working-class suburb of Philadelphia with a large percentage of single parents, low education levels, and a high percentage of African immigrants who are often under-employed.

CURRENT STATUS:
Through additional funding by Exelon Generation, the program is ongoing at the H&S Learning Center and Carson Valley Children’s Aid, with recent expansion to the Drueding Center and All Saints Church, Collingdale. The goal is to continue to replicate this songwriting program in regional community centers that serve at-risk youth. As of October 2011, 145 children have taken part in Hear Our Voices.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Evaluation measures of the overall program have determined that children benefit from increased self-esteem, while therapists have observed increased group cohesion and ability to shift negative emotions into positive emotions during a session. Evaluation of the individual songwriting sessions at Carson Valley suggest that participants experienced decreased anxiety while also being more motivated to participate in other therapies.

 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.temple.edu/boyer/ResearchCenter/MARgrant.htm
http://www.temple.edu/boyer/researchcenter/

Publications:
MacDonald, S. & Viega, M. (2011). "Hear Our Voices: A music therapy songwriting
program and the message of the Little Saints through the medium of rap” in S. Hadley & G.
Yancey, Eds., Therapeutic uses of rap and hip hop. London: Routledge.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Arts and Quality of Life Research Center, Temple University
Address: Temple University, Presser Hall. 2001 N.13 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Phone: 215-204-8542
Contact Persons: Dr. Cheryl Dileo, Director, Dr. Andrea McGraw Hunt, Assistant Director
Email: aqlrcenter@temple.edu


SECTIONS: I, II, IV
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
TRANSFORMING LIVES AND COMMUNITIES THROUGH MUSIC: THE CENTER FOR MUSIC NATIONAL SERVICE

DESCRIPTION:
The Center for Music National Service (MNS) is a nonprofit organization that supports music as a strategy for public good. Through direct programs and advocacy, MNS promotes music as an intervention to improve student success, soothe the sick, and strengthen communities of all kinds.

MusicianCorps, MNS’s flagship program, trains and places musicians to serve full-time as teachers and mentors in low-performing public schools, youth centers, and other high-need community settings. MusicianCorps uses music to reengage youth in their academic and civic lives, and provide them the skills critical to success in the 21st century. MusicianCorps has the following key goals (see the Research and Evaluation section of this report for additional information): Keeping students in school, Building 21st century workforce skills, Making music accessible and strengthening community.

MusicianCorps Mentors are skilled musicians who have demonstrated a commitment to making a positive impact in their community. Mentors receive a living stipend, health care and professional development in exchange for a year-long service term. MC Mentors provide 4 days per week of music instruction and engagement at 1-2 high-need service sites. Weekly “5th days” are dedicated to community service and outreach, corps-based reflection and leadership development. 

The MusicianCorps curriculum has four main components:

  • Music Instruction: Project-based instruction focused in composition, improvisation and performance
  • Arts Integration: Incorporating music into core subjects such as math, literacy, and technology to heighten students’ perception and understanding
  • Service Learning: Youth apply and strengthen skills learned in the classroom through quarterly engagement in Music Service Days, performances and community events
  • Consistent Mentorship: Young adult MusicianCorps Mentors serve as reliable and relatable role models for youth

CURRENT STATUS:
MNS is funded by both private and public sources. The organization’s current priority is multi-state expansion of its flagship program, MusicianCorps. As a participant at Clinton Global Initiative (CGI America) 2011, MNS made a commitment to expand MusicianCorps to 3-5 cities by Fall 2012. Currently supported in part by an AmeriCorps planning grant, MNS is a candidate for AmeriCorps National Direct funding through the Corporation for National and Community Service.

MNS is also piloting a new MusicianCorps Health & Wellness pilot initiative that supports in the physical, mental, and emotional recovery of patients, veterans, and other populations. Serving in children’s and veteran’s hospitals, hospice residences and senior homes, the Health & Wellness Initiative uses music therapy to reduce anxiety and stress while providing non-pharmacological management for pain. It also improves patients’ moods and emotional states, allowing them to participate actively in their own treatment.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
In just over two years of programming, MusicianCorps has demonstrated the following key impacts:

  • Keeping Students In School

MusicianCorps Mentors motivate students to stay in school. In the midst of a national crisis that has seen high school dropout numbers reach dramatic new heights over the past decade, 7 out of 10 high school students say they want to come to school more because of Musician Corps.

  • Building 21st Century Workforce Skills

MusicianCorps focuses on creative expression, composition, and teamwork to increase
youths’ chances for long-term success. A recent IBM poll of 1,500 CEOs identified
creativity as the No. 1 ‘leadership competency‘ of the future (The Creativity Crisis, Newsweek 2010), and the Conference Board reports that creativity rates among the top five skills needed in the workplace. In the 2010-11 program year, 70% of school site partners agreed youth were more creative after MusicianCorps, and 80% agreed youth were better able to express themselves. 

  • Making Music Accessible

MusicianCorps works to restore music in the schools that need it most. Despite being consistently hailed as a cornerstone of a complete education curriculum, the time spent on music instruction has steadily decreased in public schools over the past twenty years, especially among schools that serve children of low socio-economic backgrounds. Since its launch in 2009, MusicianCorps Mentors have empowered 5,400 underprivileged youth with ongoing music instruction and music-making opportunities.

  • Strengthening Community

In a time when people are feeling more disconnected from their communities and each other, MusicianCorps harnesses the unique power of music to bring people together, providing students an opportunity to exercise community leadership. Over 16,000 community members have participated in 215 MusicianCorps service days, performances, and public events in just over two years.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.musicnationalservice.org

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Center for Music National Service
Address: 3254 19th St | 2nd Floor
San Francisco, CA 94110
Phone: 415-839-8902 | Fax: 415-840-7202
Contact Persons:
Kiff Gallagher, CEO & Founder; Email: kiff@musicnationalservice.org
Laura Page, Deputy Director; Email: laura@musicnationalservice.org


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefNON-AUTONOMOUS TERRITORY:
Puerto Rico
PROJECT:
MUSIC FOR CULTURAL PRESERVATION: TACUAFAN

DESCRIPTION:
TACUAFAN (Taller Cultural Afro Antillano) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to promoting the musical and cultural wealth of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean over the last thirty years. The project promotes the legacy of Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, a Puerto Rican born in Barrio Obrero and who left a historic legacy about human rights and arts preservation. TACUAFAN began in this socially and economically disadvantaged community in the City of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Through cultural workshops incorporating the use of percussion, flute, theatre, community forums and conferences, movie exhibitions and cultural/recreational trips, awareness of the value of cultural Caribbean music and its preservation has spread extensively in Puerto Rico. TACUAFAN maintains a sustainable community educational music program through the sales of CDs and artistic presentations.

This project has sponsored the following:

  • Community Recognition & Awards Activities
  • Publications including CDs of music (folkloric, popular and progressive) from Puerto Rico and the Caribbean with explanations in Spanish, English, French and Japanese
  • A documentary movie about the history of Barrio Obrero
  • The co-production of the first and second Symposium entitled: “Afro-America and Its Religious Culture” with the University of Puerto Rico
  • The development of musical modules for the annual conferences of the Program in Social Studies at the Puerto Rican Department of Education entitled “Commemoration of the Abolition of Slavery“ and “Commemoration of the Discovery of Puerto Rico”
  • The development of micro-business workshops for adolescents in sound engineering

 

CURRENT STATUS:
At present, work is in progress on the construction of a building to be called the Caribbean Cultural Center that will house TACUAFAN and its projects. TACUAFAN is spearheading an effort to construct a monument in Mayaguez City inspired by the “Plena”, the national rhythm, so as to position it at the high-level it deserves next to other cultural achievements. It has produced a short film designed to rescue the traditional chants known as the Rosario de Cruz de Mayo. TACUAFAN is also launching a new Caribbean rhythmical concept entitled “The TULULU,” a beat created around the folklore of the island of Guadeloupe. Project funding comes mostly from CDs sales, artistic shows, government and organization proposals.

TACUAFAN’s accomplishments have been recognized by the City of San Juan, The School of Architecture of the University of Puerto Rico (the URBE award for Community Service), Puerto Rico Bar Association, and Commission Against Racial Equality the Center for Advanced Studies of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean and the Council Against Racism, among others.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.tacuafan.com
www.caribejazz.com
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Tacuafan
Address: P.O. Box 7832 San Juan, Puerto Rico 00916-7832
Phone: (787) 627-0094
Contact Person: Víctor López Ramírez
E-mail: info@tacuafan.com, concultura@onelinkpr.net


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefNON-AUTONOMOUS TERRITORY: 
Puerto Rico

PROJECT:
MUSIC TO PROMOTE ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS: ECOMUSICLAJE

DESCRIPTION:
EcoMusiclaje is a not-for-profit organization operating under the laws of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The Spanish term “EcoMusiclaje” is the fusion of three words: ecología, música and reciclaje (ecology, music and recycle). EcoMusiclaje is the art of making music with recycled materials from nature and every day items. The main goal of the music workshops is to promote awareness of eco-friendly practices through the teaching of music.

For over thirty years EcoMusiclaje has worked in the field of music education with people of all ages and backgrounds. The program also includes people with autism, Down’s syndrome and visual impairments. String, wind and percussion instruments are made with natural materials such as gourds, seed pods, coconut shells, bamboo, sea shells, bones, wood sticks, leather skins, and found objects such as plastic, glass, and metal. This type of instrument shows historically how the first humans made music. In this manner we have produced a very original and unique musical project. 

Other educational activities are focused on how to use music in science, Spanish, English, and history courses. One of the most important topics included in educational and community activities is the influence of Africa on the instruments and music of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. Students from different geographical areas and economic backgrounds have benefited from workshops that have brought close to 30,000 students together from public and private schools, art schools, cultural centers, public libraries, government centers, and community based organizations. Workshops have served to awaken interest and motivation in participants to learn and to continue to learn and study music.

Puerto Rico is a developing country with an unemployment rate of 16% as of August, 2011 and a poverty rate of 45% in 2009 (www.census.gov). People suffer from few economic opportunities which leads to a high rate of criminality. EcoMusiclaje has motivated youth from economically deprived communities to engage in successful musical careers away from crime and poverty.  There is now a collection of over 250 musical instruments in the Museo Rodante EcoMusiclaje (EcoMusiclaje Museum on Wheels). Workshops and exhibitions are offered at various parks, among them, Jardín Botánico de Caguas, Puerto Rico (Botanical Garden of Caguas), Parque Ecológico Punto Verde de San Juan, Puerto Rico (Green Point Ecological Park) and Parque del Niño de Bayamón, Puerto Rico (Childrens Park of Bayamon).  

Training is offered for teachers and community leaders, tourists and the general public. For several years now there have been organized summer camps for different agencies that include music, recycling and the cultural aspects of music.

CURRENT STATUS:
Original textbooks are being used in the project that integrate elements of music therapy, art therapy and music instruction with science, mathematics, and social studies in order to elevate the academic level of the participants. These texts also are used to facilitate the learning of people with disabilities. Other techniques and methods are offered to teachers interested in teaching the traditional music of Puerto Rico and the folklore of all the Americas.

EcoMusiclaje held a public installation with eco-friendly instruments at the Caguas Botanical Garden, an eco-friendly park of the City of Caguas. The program began on August 12, 2011 and ended on October 30, 2011. Also, the project is currently planning its 2012 Summer Camp (June 2012). The summer camp will serve children from four to twelve years old. EcoMusiclaje is also developing a new book entitled Music-Art Therapy. They would like to eventually develop a huge ecological musical park surrounded by the mountains of Puerto Rico. 

The children of the Community of Piñones participated in the production of a compact disc entitled “Primitivismo” (Primitivism). For the production of this album all the instruments used were made with natural or recycled material.

Activities are financed through fee for services including workshops, conferences, lectures, book sales and summer camp.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
EcoMusiclaje over the years has documented its work qualitatively through videos and letters. The Punto Verde Organization studied the EcoMusiclaje project for one semester. After evaluating the students who participated, it was found that their academic achievement improved greatly.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/RAULBERRIOSTV
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTtU7xz0a0U

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: EcoMusiclaje
Address: Urb Carolina Alta N. Landrau F-25 Carolina P.R. 00987
Phone: (939) 246-8715 or (787) 376-8713
E-mail address: ecomusiclaje@gmail.com
Contact Persons: Raúl Berrios Sánchez; Email: clave.tres@yahoo.com
                         Waleska López Jiménez; Email: indici@onelinkpr.net


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefNON-AUTONOMOUS TERRITORY: 
Puerto Rico

PROJECT:
PROMOTING CULTURAL INTEGRATION: ARTESANTURCE: DE BARRIO OBRERO A LA 15

DESCRIPTION:
The initiative arteSanturce: De Barrio Obrero a la 15 is an effort to promote, preserve and integrate the musical and  artistic development of one of the most historic and prestigious cultural districts of Puerto Rico. The Conservatory of Music of Puerto Rico having found itself in a new location in Santurce, decided to undertake this project as it realized that its new location provided an opportunity to refocus attention on the role that music plays in society and the way that society shapes future musicians.

The Conservatory together with a committed group of art-driven organizations, came together as partners who believe in social development through the integration of the arts. It is composed of a theater company, several dance groups, two museums, a cultural center, three theaters and exhibition halls, the college of architecture, the national institute of culture and two institutions of higher education.

The project also promotes the economic health of Puerto Rico as a cultural tourism destination by making music the center of a new creative economy. arteSanturce was established as a means of developing and encouraging musical enterprises in the region. This is a conscious effort to seed a new creative economy through incentives and educational opportunities for established musicians and artists in Santurce. This is being accomplished through the development of workshops, music academies, instrument repair and construction companies, and recording studios to support the growth of urban musical genres. arteSanturce, in collaboration with the Development Bank of PR, created a stimulative mechanism in which loans are offered at favorable terms to promote initiatives for the creative economy.

Another goal is to integrate the local school system with Arts Education thereby transforming the educational environment. It is an unprecedented effort that integrates prestigious cultural institutions and the community. It will impact 8,500 students in 29 Santurce schools, while providing creative opportunities for a new generation of children.
The following examples are being sponsored by this alliance:

  • Musical heritage has been preserved in this area through an event called The Belen, a rite honoring the contributions of historic figures through singing and music on the dates that commemorate their passing.  Recordings were made by Belen musicians last year to help promote greater cultural awareness to new audiences. 
  • Every month an event is coordinated called Santurceando with the arteSanturce Alliance that involves different venues including music, art, dance, architecture, theater, cuisine and music spaces.
  • El Nuevo Sonidero, a new initiative, is a multidisciplinary approach to music creation from the Conservatory of Music which fosters new musical fusions and collaboration between traditional and contemporary genres. This promotes the utilization of novel platforms for performance and presentation of materials.
  • VibraSanturce is a Multidisciplinary Art Festival.
  • BrillaSantuIurce is a Christmas Arts Parade led by a multiple organizations that kicks off the holidays in Santurce.  This display of music, dance and school bands promotes memories of the old time Ponce de León Avenue.

CURRENT STATUS:
Currently projects of arteSanturce are being implemented by the local School District.  The initiative is supported by a combination of government, corporations and foundations including: Coribantes Theatre, the University of the Sacred Heart, the Luis A. Ferré Fine Arts Centre, Mauro dance school, the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture: theaters Francisco Arriví and Victoria Espinosa, the Puerto Rico’s Architect Association and College of Architects, the Corporation of Musical Arts, Children’s Choir of San Juan, the Museum of Art of Puerto Rico, Ballet Concert of Puerto Rico, San Juan Ballets, the Museum of Contemporary Art of Puerto Rico, the dance company Andanza, the Conservatory of Music of Puerto Rico, and Casa Aboy.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Websites:
http://www.artesanturce.net
http://artenegocios.wordpress.com
http://www. Elnuevosonidero.blogspot.com

Videos:
http://www.facebook.com/artesanturce
http://flickr.com/photos/artesanturce
http://youtube.com/user/artesanturce

CONTACT INFORMATION:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Organization: arteSanturce: De Barrio Obrero a la 15
Address: 951 Ave. Ponce de León San Juan, PR 00907-3373
Phone: 787-751-0160 ext. 239 and Fax: 787-766-1216
Contact Persons: Project Director: Antonio González-Walker Ph.D.
Email: tgw@cmpr.gobierno.pr
Assistant: Denissa S. Morales Barrios, Assistant
Email: dmorales@cmpr.gobierno.pr


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Lifelong Learning
SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefCOUNTRY:
Afghanistan

PROJECT:
PRESERVING AND RETURNING THE MUSICAL HERITAGE OF AFGHANISTAN: AFGHAN CHILDREN’S SONGBOOK PROJECT

DESCRIPTION:
The Afghan Children’s Songbook Project began in 2002 with a songbook of traditional Afghan children’s songs that had been collected in Afghanistan in the late 60’s. Keenly aware that Afghanistan had suffered almost two decades of war and the systematic eradication of all music, there was a fear that these children’s songs would be lost forever.  Now, nine years later, with the involvement of an Afghan-owned graphic design and printing company, a newly designed songbook, CD/cassette tape and Teacher’s Guide have been produced based on the original collection.

When the Taliban banned all music from Afghan culture, the hardest hit were the women and children. Women were no longer allowed to sing to their children and children could not sing in schools or during playtime. The impact of returning these songs to Afghan children and their families cannot be underestimated. For many Afghans, hearing these songs again brings them to tears. Essential to the project is the fact that each child receives their own book.

With the songbook children are able to sing their traditional songs and at the same time are motivated to follow the words in the books, thereby enhancing their literacy skills. The songbook not only honors the diverse ethnic music of Afghanistan but also broadens and deepens an Afghan child’s educational experience through the use of music. Most children in Afghanistan are taught only by a rote method of learning. The Teacher’s Guide provides lesson ideas that enhance basic literacy skills. In this way, the songbook provides another method for teaching basic reading and writing skills. The songbooks are highly valued by educators, heads of schools and heads of villages.

The main objectives of this project are:

  • To preserve and return traditional Afghan children’s songs to young children across Afghanistan, distributing them to elementary schools and orphanages where they can be integrated into the education curriculum
  • To preserve and honor the rich musical heritage of Afghanistan
  • To use the songbook as a musical tool to enhance basic literacy skills for young Afghan children
  • To enhance basic literacy skills of Afghan women, many of whom have suffered from years of oppression, by using music in education

CURRENT STATUS:
Currently, 30,000 songbooks have been distributed across Afghanistan in approximately ten Provinces. It is the policy of the Songbook Project for every child in a school to receive their own songbook and every teacher to receive a Teacher’s Guide. Students are generally taught reading and writing by rote without any pens or pencils. With the most recent printing of 5,000 songbooks, included in each songbook package are a blank notebook and 2 pencils.  This additional material allows the children to build on their reading and writing skills with guidance from the teacher.  

To date, 1,000 Teacher's Guides have been distributed. The Guide provides teachers with six to eight lesson ideas for each song in the songbook.  The lessons are focused on improving basic reading and writing skills. Reports are being received from teachers across Afghanistan stating how much they appreciate having their own teaching resource material. It is something they previously have not had access to. In Afghanistan most teachers receive little to no training. The teachers remark that the lessons in the Teacher’s Guide have opened new ways to think about teaching that enhances creative thinking and problem solving skills. 

The songbook, CD’s and cassette tapes are all produced in Kabul by an Afghan-owned company, TriVision, Kabul. This supports the Afghan economy and avoids prohibitive shipping costs. The books are distributed by several not-for-profit Afghan, Afghan-American or Canadian educational organizations, all of whom provide a report of where the songbooks have been distributed and photo documentation.   

There are plans, if funded, in 2012 to produce a 2nd songbook and another Teacher’s Guide to accompany it. An Afghan woman is helping to collect additional traditional songs to add to the current collection. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.afghansongbook.org
Facebook: Afghan Children’s Songbook

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Folk Arts Center of New England, a nonprofit 501 (c ) (3)
Address: 25 Whitney Ave. Cambridge, MA  02139
Phone: 617-354-3182 (h), 617-759-4486 (cell), Fax: 617-349-8142
Contact Person: Louise Pascale, Project Director, Afghan Children’s Songbook Project
Email: lpascale@lesley.edu


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
\clefCOUNTRY:
Afghanistan

PROJECT:
REBUILDING MUSIC EDUCATION FOR AFGHAN YOUTH AND ESTABLISHING THE AFGHANISTAN NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

DESCRIPTION:
The Revival of Music Education in Afghanistan is a project that has been adopted by the Ministry of Education of Afghanistan. The project seeks to establish a music institute as the first step to developing a national music education program and to assist the revival of Afghan music traditions and instruments through music education. The music education entity, Afghanistan’s National Institute of Music (ANIM), is the first institution for gifted and motivated Afghan youth regardless of gender and social circumstances.  The project is particularly focused on supporting orphans and street kids who will comprise fifty per cent of students. Other non-elite and underserved children will fill in the remaining places.

The students of the ANIM have the opportunity to become positive and inspiring musicians with long term sustainable livelihood.  As part of the process of national reconstruction and the revival of Afghan music traditions graduates of the ANIM will have the capacity and skills to enhance the educational, artistic, social and cultural life of Afghanistan.

CURRENT STATUS:
Afghanistan National Institute of Music has been established and inaugurated in June 2010.  It operates under the Ministry of Education of Afghanistan.  The ANIM offers high quality general education and combined specialized training in Afghan classical and Western music for children ranging from grade 4 to year 14. Currently 150 students (to be expanded to 300) are enrolled in ANIM, one-third of which are orphans and street-working children. Around 30% of the current students are girls. ANIM boasts facilities that are comparable to those of the finest music schools in the US and Europe. This includes wood paneling, handcrafted furniture, sound proofed rehearsing rooms, networked library, IT lab, Multi-media room, and a well-stocked library. ANIM has high quality Western musical instruments as well. Additionally, ANIM has established a rich collection of traditional instruments from Afghanistan and the subcontinent. ANIM has a world class ten-year music curriculum based on the wide range of both Afghan and Western music traditions, complimented by teaching and learning resources for all western musical instruments, utilizing textbooks, music sheets, method books, CD, DVD, music software, etc.
This project has the financial and academic support of:   

—  Ministry of Education of
      Afghanistan (MOE)
—  World Bank
—  German Foreign Office
—  Government of India
—  Embassy of the USA
—  German Cultural Centre, Goethe
      Institute, Kabul
—  Society of Music Merchants
      (SOMM)
—  Embassy of Finland
—  Embassy of the Netherlands
—  National Association of Music Manufactures (NAMM)
—  Association of the American Voices
—  Yamaha Gulf
—  Taiwan Reliance
—  National College of Music, London
—  Monash University, Australia
—  International Society for
      Music Education
—  International Music Council

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Since the viability of the ANIM in Afghanistan has been established, Monash Asia, Monash University, Australia has initiated a research project to investigate the effect of ANIM and music education in Afghanistan. It is also expected that this project will attract other scholars to participate in documenting the nature of the revitalisation of music in Afghanistan. Furthermore, there is a plan to fund doctoral and masters scholarships from the Afghanistan and Australian governments to recruit talented Afghans to undertake dissertations on the above named topics as well as documenting:

  • The condition of orphans in Kabul and the role of music in their healing process
  • The origins of the revitalised Music Institute in Kabul and whether and how this provides a model for institution building in a post-conflict situation
  • The obstacles to providing music education for the teachers of music and how these might be overcome
  • The nature of the music curriculum that has been developed and how it accommodates the social and cultural complexity of Afghanistan
  • Politics and music - warlords, the Taliban and other perspectives on music in modern Afghanistan

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Project website:
http://www.afghanistannationalinstituteofmusic.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=55&Itemid=58

This initiative has been recognized and awarded by the International Music Council:
http://www.imc-cim.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=330&Itemid=1

Awards Received:
-David Chow Humanitarian Award http://www.davidchowfoundation.org/allawardgallery.html
-Government of Afghanistan Education Award by the Ministry of Education http://www.afghanistannationalinstituteofmusic.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=87&Itemid=77 
-Special Commendation of the Ministry of Culture and Information of Afghanistan.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Afghanistan National Institute of Music
Phone: +93 (0)796542952 or +613 42198 1246
Contact Person: Dr. Ahmad Sarmast, Founder and Director
E-mail: ahmad.sarmast@adm.monash.edu.au


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY: 
China

PROJECT: 
CHILDREN’S CHOIR FOR PRESERVING THE CULTURAL HERITAGE OF ETHNIC MINORITIES: QUINTESSENSO CULTURAL WORK (QCW)

DESCRIPTION:
Quintessenso Cultural Work (QCW) was founded in 2007. QCW believes that it is essential to preserve the history and the cultural heritage of the Chinese ethnic minorities living in the grasslands, forests and highlands of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China.  During the past four years, two children’s choirs were formed, named Quintessenso Hulun Buir Children’s Choir, and Quintessenso Kashgar Children’s Art Troupe. The Quintessenso Hulun Buir Children’s Choir was formed in the eastern part of China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The choir consists of children from the Mongolian tribes, along with children from the Oroqen, Ewenki and Daghur ethnic minorities. It is China’s first ethnic minority children’s choir.

The Choir currently has about forty children, ranging in age from five to thirteen. Two-thirds of the children come from the steppes, forest areas and farming villages of the region. The thirty-some songs, primarily children’s songs and folk ballads passed down through generations, are sung in the five native languages and dialects. Since its inception, the choir has performed over 40 concerts, under the theme “Hulun Buir Fantasy,” in the cities of Beijing, Tianjin, Hohhot, Shenzhen, Hong Kong and Taipei. The choir has been warmly received and enchanted audience from all walks of life including professional critics.

With the success of Quintessenso Hulun Buir Children’s Choir, the Quintessenso Kashgar Children’s Troupe was formed in Kashgar, Xinjiang, in China’s western frontier. The children in this group come from Tajik, Uzbek, Kirgiz, and Uyghur ethnicities. 

During the 2008 Szechuan earthquake, one of the choirs songs, “Wulaleji”, was chosen by Phoenix TV as the theme song for mind soothing and regaining inner strength, and was played on TV for more than 500 times. 

CURRENT STATUS:
Quintessenso Cultural Work has become an example of excellent musical education in China. It’s songs have been selected by the government as one of the compulsory musical courses to be taught in primary schools of the Inner Mongolia Region of China. QCW is mainly located in Beijing, with branch offices, in Hulun Buir of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and Kashgar of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

In 2010, the Choir’s brand new musical “My H.O.M.E. – Hulun Buir Fantasy” premiered at the Shanghai Expo of music. Also in 2010, Quintessenso Children’s Choir and the China Philharmonic Orchestra gave a joint concert on New Year’s Eve. They then presented a series of grand performances that fused Western classic instruments with Mongolian nomadic traditional tunes.

Both the Quintessenso Hulun Buir Childrens Choir and the Quintessenso Kashgar Children’s Troupes are registered nonprofit organizations. Wucai Children’s Foundation was established for the purpose of supporting the culture and education work of the children from the ethnic minorities living in China. QCW is partly supported by the government of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in China, and partly supported by various corporate sponsors, including banks, listed corporations, and private enterprises.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.5wccs.com                   

Blog: http://blog.sina.com.cn/wccs2007 
Weibo (Twitter in China): http://weibo.com/wccs2007

Video:
http://ent.ifeng.com/5wccs/video/detail_2010_10/18/2816612_0.shtml (in Chinese)
http://ent.ifeng.com/5wccs/video/detail_2010_09/03/2431225_0.shtml (in Chinese)

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Wucai Cultural & Arts Co., Ltd
Address: Flat 602. A-8. Noble Quadrangle, Dong Cheng District, Beijing, 100008
Phone: (+86) 13911688886 and Fax: (+8610) 62450330
Contact Person: Miss Wang Yu Zhe, Choir Founder and Director
E-mail:  A18018@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
China

PROJECT:
MAKING MUSIC WITH A TRADITIONAL CHINESE FOLK INSTRUMENT IN SCHOOLS AND UNIVERSITIES: THE OCARINA PROJECT

DESCRIPTION:
Many students dream of knowing and owning a favorite musical instrument. However, when it comes to learning an instrument, many students have the same problem: the instrument is either too sophisticated to learn or too expensive to afford. Due to economic problems and lack of funding for school music education, many students in China cannot obtain a music education or have the chance to learn an instrument. Many people regard the ocarina flute as an important musical instrument. As a small musical instrument, it is well suited to group instruction. Its attractive sound, colorful appearance, affordable price, and lovely and varied shapes have earned many enthusiasts for the instrument.

This project aims to enhance school music education, promote national culture and art, and find a better way to help students learn music. The ocarina flute is regarded as a Chinese folk instrument, and as such, folk music and traditional Chinese music have been used widely in this project. Currently there are three schools and three universities involved in this project: more than 10,000 students are learning the ocarina flute, and potentially there could be more than 150,000 students involved.

CURRENT STATUS:
An ocarina textbook, 2 CDs and one research paper have been published. Another two books are expected to be published by the end of this year. The Chinese Ocarina Art Committee has organized a 5-day national ocarina master class for music teachers and Ocarina is being taught in different parts of the country. Since March 2010, the “Super-star Digital Library” (SDL) is videotaping a full semester’s ocarina class at China University of Petroleum in Beijing. Free ocarina instruction will be available from the SDL Website after the movie is published.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.taodi.org/
http://ocarina.ning.com/
http://hi.baidu.com/ocarinaclub  (in Chinese)
http://www.rymusic.com.cn/q3/newsdetail.cfm?iCntno=2885

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Chinese Ocarina Art Committee
Address: China University of Petroleum in Beijing, School of Humanities & Social Sciences
18 Fuxue Rd., Changping District, Beijing 102249
Phone: (+86)158-1055 6970(cell), 10-8011 6429(office)
Contact person: Dafu Lai
Email: didalai@yahoo.com.cn


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
India

PROJECT:
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION IN A CREATIVE COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE FOR AT-RISK YOUTH: SVARAM

DESCRIPTION:
Since 2003, Svaram is one of many outreach projects of the internationally recognized Community of Auroville, India and is dedicated to the improvement of its local, indigenous neighborhoods in the surrounding villages of Tamil Nadu. Svaram is a vocational training opportunity for the youth of local villages. The training program focuses on the teaching of instrument design and construction, musical theory and practice and organizational skills. In addition to the hands-on aspect of the training, the youth are exposed to traditional performing arts and crafts to enhance awareness about the rich heritage of Tamil Culture. Involvement in this educational, vocational and employment activity helps to save the rural indigenous youth from the ever present onslaught of juvenile alcoholism, aggressive behavior, gang formation and criminality.

Svaram is dedicated to creating new musical instruments which are available to everyone, regardless of age, talent, social or cultural background. SVARAM may possibly be one of the few places on the Indian subcontinent experimenting in the field of creating new musical instruments. The learning process is monitored and guided by selected resource people and teachers in the area of crafts, management, design, music and body awareness, cultural integration and development.

Svaram program promotes the following:

  • Trains local youth in the production and marketing of musical instruments for income generation based on a model of cooperative management
  • Engages in technical and musicological research exploring this new field of research into “sound materials,” bringing together Indian traditional methods and the expertise of a contemporary world music culture
  • Involves international students and volunteers and hosts graduates of Indian colleges for internships and field research work.
  • Supports a social outreach program sharing the acquired skills in village cultural education
  • Participates in local and national cultural programs

CURRENT STATUS:
Now in the later phase of the 10-year development plan, the aim for the completion of the first ten years will be the ability to run the community enterprise in an independent and sustainable way. Started as a youth project, the original trainees are currently raising families and stepping into responsible positions in their home situations. They are challenged to manage the production and ongoing project work. Therefore the focus with the younger team is on capacity building, both in technical craft as well as organizational and social/life skills. The goal is to enhance the participatory management model of Svaram – integrating former illiterate young man in decision-making processes of the emerging community enterprise.

Generally speaking, Auroville activities are financed by donations from Auroville residents, through income generated by Auroville business units and by international grants and donations. These activities are co-ordinated by various Auroville working groups. (http://www.auroville.org/economy/internal.htm)

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Through the integration of the traditional calendar and events our program has a clearly defined yearly cycle with various emphasizes according to seasonal changes, and a yearly evaluation in May (a hot summer month) is welcomed by the whole team to introspect, raise awareness and integrate. The pragmatic work with crafts, skills and production offers concrete measurable results and we found that it is important for the youth themselves to be able to see and evaluate their own progress, both through analyses of challenges/improvement of performance at work and problems/positive changes in their village/social and peer environment.

Learning and working together has become the pulse of the project and it is a gift to see how the senior members (from the first training) are now supporting the junior members who in turn are helping new trainees. The project initiators are responsible for ongoing research, innovations and new processes.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.svaram.org
Beginnings: http://roots.svaram.org and Video: http://vimeo.com/4606723

Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miZSp3HnCRg&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmqd2ivA_nM 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdHsoRVWh6g&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVfH4SK4fEI&feature=related

Publications:
http://www.auroville.org/environment/avag/svaram/svaram.htm
http://www.auroville.org/journals%26media/avtoday/March_2011/AVT-261-8-LR.pdf
https://normt.uib.no/index.php/voices/article/view/369

Volunteers Blog:
http://svaram.bitfusion.org/?p=163

Radio:
http://www.aurovilleradio.org/economy/commercial-units/2158-spirit-in-sound

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Svaram
Address: Musical Instruments and Research, Kottakarai, Auroville,
            Tamil Nadu 605111, India
Phone: +91-413-2622 220
Contact Person: Aurelio A.C.Hammer
Email: aurelio@auroville.org.in


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
Music for Working With Trauma Survivors
clefCOUNTRY:
India

PROJECT:
THE COMMUNITY MUSIC THERAPY PROGRAM: THE MUSIC THERAPY TRUST

 Please Refer to SECTION II, PAGE 110


 SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Working With Trauma Survivors
clefCOUNTRY:
Japan

PROJECT:
BIG BAND FOR PEOPLE WITH AND WITHOUT DISABILITIES: COMMUON

DESCRIPTION:
The not-for-profit Organization to Promote Community Music Therapy (Commuon), located in Sedai City, has two missions. One is to encourage the public to enjoy music more and the other is to provide the opportunity for people with and without disability to play music together.

In Japan, opportunities to make music and enjoy live music performances are extremely limited. The general public rarely has an opportunity to experience interactive musical relationships. It seems that Japanese people enjoy music only through CDs and in concert halls, where most performances are of a very high quality and by professional artists. Such experiences tend to establish a distance between the performers and the audience.

Commuon’s primary objective is to bring music back to the general public, with the philosophy that playing and enjoying music is universal. To address this issue, “Commuon the Big Band” was formed in which both disabled and non-disabled people would participate by playing musical instruments they like, or by singing. “Commuon the Big Band” consists of about 30 members with various levels of musical skills from total beginners to professional musicians.

In the course of the band’s activities, various interesting musical interactions have developed among the members. Not only is it possible for members with various levels of musical skills to perform together, the cohesion of the ensemble is improved. Having members with disabilities does not lower the quality of music. On the contrary, it enhances the quality of music through their responsiveness and “prefixed-idea-free” expression in improvisation making the sound unique. All of these are achieved through careful preparations and arrangements by the music therapist who is knowledgeable in music and disabilities as well as skilled in conducting and leading musical ensembles.

Since its formation in July 2007, “Commuon the Big Band” has participated in community musical events and hosted its own event in September 2009. Commuon is preparing to launch the “Commuon the Big Band II” with a new director who has performed as the main pianist in the first Commuon the Big Band. In doing so, the expanded initiative will promote the same kind of musical interactions with other members in the community.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Japan Earthquake happened on Friday, March 11th 2011. It was the most powerful earthquake ever measured in Japan, breaching a 9.0 magnitude. More than 27,000 are dead and missing. The maximum height of the tsunami was 38.9 meters (127 ft.) and the inundated area is about 561 square kilometers.  A total of six prefectures on the Pacific coast of eastern Japan have been affected: Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima, Ibaraki and Chiba. The tsunami has also destroyed the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Three prefectures in the Tohoku (North-Eastern) region of Japan, Miyagi, Iwate, and Fukushima, have been most seriously devastated.

The earthquake devastated the towns and cities where the Commuon activities take place. All members of the Commuon Big Band have been impacted. Some members received tremendous damage from the tsunami.  Some are unable to attend activities because the railroad has been washed away and there was no transportation. Some cannot come because their work place has been changed. Due to the natural disaster, activities were unable to resume until May of 2011. Commuon the Big Band has now become a place for members to come together, play music and support each other not only as musicians but also as friends. The current priority now is to sustain the activity, to keep the rehearsals constant, providing a place for the members to gather together to play music.  

Commuon Big Band participated in the Tricolore Music Festival in September 2010 that took place in Ishinomaki, where the tsunami washed away part of the town.  Ishinomaki is also a town where some of the members with disability live.  It means a lot more than just to participate in the festival.  We are hoping it would help the town to be revitalized with music.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://web.mac.com/commuon/
http://www.youtube.com/user/commuon
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35SXPJ05vZA&feature=related

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Contact Person:  Yuji Igari, Founder and Director of Commuon
Email: commuon@mac.com


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Japan

PROJECT:
TO ENHANCE CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION THROUGH MUSIC: YOKOHAMA COMMUNITY MUSIC PROJECT

DESCRIPTION:
Yokohama, with a multicultural population of over three million people, is Japan's second largest city. In the Tsurumi District there are many who are foreign nationals. Yokohama is a city that believes creativity has the power to generate new urban dynamism and values as well as promote civic consciousness. In order to cope with globalization, numerous events have been held that celebrate cultural diversity and enrich cultural identity.

The Community Development Department of the Tsurumi District of Yokohama, recognizing the need for ongoing and active participation by people to reach a deeper level of verbal and non-verbal communications, sponsored an ongoing project using music and music activities to enhance cross-cultural communications.

In 2007 at the Ushioda Elementary School, three music therapists worked with two percussionists and introduced a community music therapy program for children who are foreign nationals. Seven children with foreign nationalities, three Japanese children and four adult citizens were involved in the program. The program used culturally relevant music and musical activities to enhance cross-cultural communication. The results of this pilot program of the Yokohama Community Development Department are very promising. This has led to the development of another Community Music Therapy program in 2009 addressing "Multicultural Symbiosis."

CURRENT STATUS:
Yokohama has been an innovator in developing and promoting Creative City initiatives in Japan. Yokohama’s creative work led to an international conference entitled “Creativity Moves the City” in 2009.

Although the program at the Ushioda Elementary School has been completed, The Yokohama Arts Foundation is currently supporting a new community music therapy program at the Kanagawa Children’s Medical Center at Minami District of Yokohama. This program focuses on music therapy for children who are orthopedically impaired. Music and musical activities are used for the reduction of stress from hospitalized children.
 
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Contact Person: Yuriko Takada
Email: Yuri0375@aol.com


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Nepal

PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY FOR AUTISTIC CHILDREN: THE MUSIC THERAPY TRUST NEPAL

 Please Refer to SECTION II, PAGE 112


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY: 
Philippines

PROJECT: 
A NATIONAL MOVEMENT TOWARDS BUILDING ORCHESTRAS OF PHILIPPINE FOLKLORIC INSTRUMENTS: ORCHESTRA SIN ARCO

DESCRIPTION: 
Orchestra Sin Arco is a nationwide grassroots movement to promote and advocate for Filipino folk instruments and folk music. An “Orchestra Sin Arco” (Orchestra Without Bows) is an ensemble of plucked and fretted Philippine folkloric musical instruments; namely the 14 stringed bandurria, alto octavina, contra octavina, guitar and standing bass. The orchestra performs Philippine folk music, new works by Filipino composers as well as the great classical music literature. OSA offers this opportunity to all children regardless of their economic circumstances or their previous musical ability.

The objectives of OSA are to:

  • instill hope, confidence, cultural identity and pride in Filipino youth
  • help youth perform better in school  
  • preserve the musical heritage and culture of the Philippines
  • create industry and livelihood development for Filipino luthiers (Bandurria, Octavina & guitar makers)

OSA activities include:

  • Building Orchestra Sin Arco ensembles in small towns and community elementary school systems
  • Training and teaching young elementary school age performers
  • Public concert performances (solo and ensemble) with exciting programming to attract and build young and educated audiences throughout the country           
  • Create solo and ensemble competitions
  • Provide teacher training programs and workshops in small towns and communities around the country
  • Offer training workshops for local luthiers
  • Commission new works by Filipino composers

CURRENT STATUS:
Orchestra Sin Arco is still in its infancy stage, however the movement is gaining momentum in the Philippines. Orchestra Sin Arco workshops started in 2001 at Silliman University in Dumaguete City Philippines. The leaders of the Silliman University Alumni Association of New Jersey/ New York, initiated and supported the initial project. Today Silliman University’s College of Performing Arts (COPA) has a 20-member performing ensemble of plucked instruments.

In August 2010:
Two separate teacher’s training workshops were given at St. Scholastica College in Manila and in Cebu City sponsored by the Cebu Guitar Council. The 10-day program at St. Scholastica’s resulted in a culminating concert of 60-member Orchestra sin Arco held at St. Cecila Hall on August 17, 2010 at St. Scholastica College.

The Tao Foundation of the Philippines has committed to sponsor a 2-week intensive training workshop for teachers and luthiers in Manila in the summer of 2011. This includes purchasing of 300 brand new concert model folk instruments to be used by the OSA workshop participants. The goal of these workshops is to establish and build ten pilot programs that will serve as models for all OSA ensembles nationwide.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Contact Person: Michael Dadap, (OSA) Founder
Email: dayoncos@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Finland

PROJECT:
MUSIC FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS: RESONAARI mUSIC SCHOOL

DESCRIPTION:
The Resonaari Music School has given learners with special needs a chance to engage in a goal-oriented study of a musical instrument. It has created educational equality and democratic musicianship. Learning and participating in music activities have empowered Resonaari’s students to step from the margins and become active members of society in many ways. As such, Resonaari’s work can be regarded as cultural social work. In the case of some students the musical skills they have acquired have enabled them to become musicians and artists. They have received national publicity through the media and performed in numerous concerts and events. As a result, their musicianship status is sparking a cultural change in all of us.

Under Finnish law, the central government and local authorities have a responsibility to arrange cultural activities that can reach everyone. However, people of all ages who have difficulties studying music with ordinary methods due to physical or intellectual limits cannot fully benefit from this. Resonaari is the only music school in Finland, and one of the few in the world designed primarily for students with special educational needs. The latest project for Resonaari is a Senior Project in which elderly people are learning music by playing in a band.

Special Music Centre Resonaari has three basic goals:

  • Educational Equality
  • Democratic Musicianship
  • Cultural Social Work

CURRENT STATUS:
Resonaari Music School has nearly 200 active students and 9 teachers. The Resonaari Music School follows the requirements of Finnish National Curriculum for Education in the Arts and consequently enjoys official music school status in Finland.  The Research and Development Unit has ongoing academic research projects in co-operation with Sibelius Academy and Helsinki University. A two-year EU-project ”Music for All” with Latvian and Estonian partners started in 2009. Resonaari’s unique project has generated widespread international interest. A Figurenotes™ book has been published in Estonian, Japanese and Italian. Moreover, the system is being tested in projects with partners in Ireland, Scotland, and Iceland.  Special Music Centre Resonaari received a Special Commendation at the inaugural of International Music Council’s (IMC) Musical Rights Awards held during IMC’s World Forum on Music in Tunis (October 2009).

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.resonaari.fi

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Special Music Centre Resonaari
Contact Person: Markku Kaikkonen, Director
Phone: +358-400-766 712 /
Email: resonaari@helsinkimissio.fi


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Ireland

PROJECT:
HONORING THE MUSIC CULTURES OF THE TRAVELLER COMMUNITY: THE NOMAD PROJECT

DESCRIPTION:
The Traveller community in Ireland has a long, vibrant and colourful musical tradition. Music is very much a part of the Traveller culture and forms an important component in their identity. The Traveller people in Ireland are one example of nomad people who live throughout the world. Other nomad populations can be found throughout Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and the Americas.

Community Music projects are at the heart of Nomad’s work.  Creative music making allows the group and the individual express themselves without judgment. This is often liberating and empowering both for the participant and the facilitator. The Nomad project (which is funded by the Higher Education Authority) facilitates community outreach programmes, workshops and seminars. Community Musicians and students from the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance conduct workshops and teach a variety of projects. Innovative, student centered, open-minded educational and shared learning experiences are all key elements in community music practice, and the results speak for themselves.

The need for a middle ground between academia and community work has been an ongoing theme in Nomad’s work, as has the recognition of marrying theory and reality in a coherent, constructive, innovative and accessible manner. This prompted those involved to devise an access course based on the needs of the Traveller community. This ‘Certificate in Music and Dance’ was developed in consultation with Nomad tutors and students. It was decided that a ‘blended learning’ delivery in partnership with regional Traveller training centres would satisfy the needs identified throughout the eight years that Nomad had been working with the Traveller community. This development offers new challenges to those interested in taking a step into an academic arena and to those offering the course.

CURRENT STATUS:
Sustainability of ‘outreach’ and access projects is imperative if they are to succeed in making a notable social, musical or educational impact. Currently, the main focus of the project is the aforementioned Certificate in Music and Dance as a vehicle for access to education at the University of Limerick.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.ul.ie/~iwmc/nomad/index.html

Publications:
Tiernan, J. (2010). Higher education in the community. Sounding Board, 1, pp. 9-12, ISSN1464630.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick
Address: Room No: IW1.33, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance,
University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland
Phone: +353-61-234743; Fax: +353-61-202589
Contact Person: Julie Tiernan, Course Director
Email: julie.tiernan@ul.ie


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Italy

PROJECT:
MUSIC FOR WELL-BEING WITH DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES:  BAMBINI AL CENTRO

DESCRIPTION:
Well beyond fostering children’s musical skills, the Bambini al Centro project aims at supporting and accompanying their overall developmental process. Since 1999, the project has operated in the suburbs of the north-east area of Rome, Italy, a problematic area of the city. Bambini al Centro is a complex system of services that aim at promoting the well-being of children ages zero to twelve. The project provides support for their parents in practical, educational, emotional and relational aspects. There are weekly meetings with groups of children who, because of social or economical difficulties, are at-risk. With regard to at-risk children, the project Bambini al Centro can be seen as an effective way to create functional groups aimed at the integration of each member through the active and creative use of the arts.

The distinctive feature of the Centre is the experience of making music in groups as a means of enhancing meaningful interpersonal relationships among children and adults. The Centre offers different kinds of activities, including a playroom (with adult guidance), visual arts programmes and a wide range of music activities in groups. The project also includes a psychologist, who has the function of coordinating and supervising the action of the staff of the Centre with regard to the inclusion of at-risk and disabled children within the groups.

CURRENT STATUS:
The project “Bambini al Centro” is supported by public funding. Since 1999, the project has been  adapting its activities in order to better meet the needs of the population being served.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.centrodidatticomusicale.it/1001%20-bambini%20al%20centro.htm(in Italian)
http://www.centrodidatticomusicale.it/CMA_Isme_2008/CDM_Contribution.htm

Publications:
Bristol (2008).  Bambini al Centro: Music as a means to promote wellbeing. Birth and configuration of an experience.  International Journal of Community Music, 1, (3), pp. 311-318.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: CDM onlus – Centro Didattico Musicale
Address: via delle Egadi, 42 – 00158 Rome, Italy
Phone: +39.335.5651444; Fax +39.06.87199435
Contact person: Valentina Iadeluca
Email: valeiad@tiscali.it


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefCOUNTRY:
Spain

PROJECT:
PROMOTING SOCIAL INCLUSION FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED CHILDREN THROUGH CHORAL SINGING: THE ALLEGRO CHOIR

DESCRIPTION:
The Allegro Choir was originally created at a school for blind and amblyopic children in Valencia, Spain, so that students could take part in the religious and recreational activities. In 1982, the program evolved according to the norms established by the Spanish National Organization for the Blind (ONCE), which aimed at encouraging the creation of musical ensembles for people with visual disabilities. Since then, the choir has included people without disabilities to facilitate the social and cultural integration of visually impaired people.

The Allegro Choir is involved with a different project every year. Each project includes two weekly 2-hour rehearsals and eleven concerts in different towns. There is a two week stay in a boarding school where, besides intensive rehearsals, cultural and recreational activities take place: activities relating to bodily movement, body expression and developing non-verbal skills. The Allegro Choir also participates in festivals, meetings, exchanges and making recordings.

In its three decades of existence, Coral Allegro has performed concerts all over Spain and in several European countries. The many highlights include the concert at the European Parliament, its performance in Barcelona with the famous tenors Pavarotti, Carreras and Domingo, and the concert in homage to the victims 2004 terrorist attack in Madrid.

CURRENT STATUS:
Presently, the average age of the members of the group is twenty-five. What started as a children’s choir has grown to become a group with mixed voices. The choir continues to work with the same amount of motivation it had at its start and most of its members are still involved. Since the beginning of 2010 the Allegro Choir has completed its fifth compact disc, entitled “Allegro de Cine” and has premiered the show “Once tardes de cine” in Cantabria and Valencia, Spain. The choir has taken part in the XII ONCE Biennale of Musical Groups in Santander, Spain, and the program Hearts in Harmony, organized by Europa Cantat and presented in Budapest. The Choir has also offered a concert in the Barcelona Auditori.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://sites.google.com/site/coralallegrooncevalencia/
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_Allegro_ONCE_Valencia
http://www.once.es/otros/agrupaciones/allegro.html

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: ONCE (Coral Allegro)
Address: Gran Vía Ramón y Cajal, 13, Valencia / Spain
Contact Persons:
Christian García: (+34) 61805233 /; Email: solsolmib@gmail.com
Julio Hurtado Llopis: (+34) 609 575 890  (+34) 963 983 180 /;  Email: julio.hurtado@uv.es


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United Kingdom
PROJECT:

BRIDGING THE TRANSITION BETWEEN THE PSYCHIATRIC AND THE COMMUNITY: THE CHELSEA COMMUNITY MUSIC THERAPY PROJECT

 Please Refer to SECTION II, PAGE 121


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefCOUNTRY:
Australia

PROJECT:
INTERGENERATIONAL INVOLVEMENT AND LEARNING THROUGH MUSIC AND THE ARTS: ARTSTORIES

 Please Refer to SECTION IV, PAGE 191


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Working With Trauma Survivors
Music for Peacebuilding
clefCOUNTRIES:
Multi-National: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Rwanda, Uganda, UK

PROJECT:
USING MUSIC TO CONNECT COMMUNITIES, BRIDGE DIVIDES ANDHEAL THE WOUNDS OF WAR: MUSICIANS WITHOUT BORDERS

DESCRIPTION:
Musicians without Borders (MwB) is an international organization that uses the power of music to connect communities, contribute to healing and reconciliation and build tolerant, nonviolent societies. MwB initiates projects, develops methodologies and organizes concerts and international conferences. MwB’s projects target all generations in all musical genres, depending on local needs and demand. Projects are designed for local control and sustainability. Musicians without Borders’ partner, MwB UK works in the UK with refugees and survivors of torture. MwB collaborates with musicians worldwide as well as with local and international cultural, development, peace and human rights organizations.

CURRENT STATUS:
MwB is actively working on the following projects:

  • Music Bus/Srebrenica Music Theater (2003-present)- Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina

            Based in the town’s cultural center, this project grew out of MwB’s Music Bus, a mobile music     workshop bringing music activities to children in ethnically divided post-war eastern Bosnia. Children from all backgrounds learn the arts of singing, dancing, acting, stagecraft, costuming and production. Current workshop leaders include youth who once were children in the MwB’s program. The project is now embedded locally as “The Srebrenica Music Theater”.  Other local and international partners include the Srebrenica Youth Center, the Srebrenica Cultural Center, Opera Circus (UK) and Theater Mimart (Serbia). MwB now acts in an advisory capacity.
            http://www.musicianswithoutborders.org/p_musicbus.htm (YouTube Video on site)

  • Music Bus Goes Middle East (2008-present)- Occupied Palestinian Territories

            Based on MwB’s work with children in Bosnia, Music Bus Goes Middle East trains talented young            Palestinians to lead children’s music workshops in West Bank refugee camps, villages, schools, hospitals and orphanages. Trainees learn community music skills, nonviolent communication and conflict resolution from MwB and partner Holy Land Trust. Now in its fourth year, the project is expanding to include training modules in rap and percussion, a song-writing course and a training of trainers, equipping Palestinian musicians with training skills for long-term change-making and project sustainability. A curriculum, manual and trainer’s guide make the project replicable in other regions.
            http://www.musicianswithoutborders.org/p_palestine.htm
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhCeUhTPIpY&feature=player_embedded

  • Winds of Change (2005- present)- Bosnia and Herzegovina

            Winds of Change is the first Bosnian wind ensemble for independent young classical talent from all backgrounds. A cooperative initiative of MwB and the Netherlands Wind Ensemble, Winds of Change aims to revive a multicultural musical heritage that was a hallmark of musical life in Bosnia and Herzegovina, while helping young musicians break out of post-war artistic isolation.
            http://www.musicianswithoutborders.org/p_windsofchange.htm
            http://www.musicianswithoutborders.org/p_nbebosnia.htm
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPYT7MKKMyI

  • Mitrovica Rock School (2008-present)- Mitrovica, Kosovo

      The ethnically divided city Mitrovica was once a regional center for rock music and cultural life. MwB formed a partnership with Community Building Mitrovica, the Dutch Fontys Rock Academy and the peace organization IKV Pax Christi to create Mitrovica Rock School and restore free rock music to the city’s youth. Housed in two branches, one on either side of the city, the Rock School employs 12 local musicians to teach 100 aspiring rock stars between the ages of       11 and 25. The students cannot meet in their own city, so MwB brings them to Skopje, Macedonia every summer for a mixed Summer School. Meanwhile, the young musicians exchange news and music through new media. The Rock School is a model for using music and          urban youth culture in divided cities to empower youth to connect across borders and forge new identities.
            http://skopjesummerschool.blogspot.com/
            http://www.youtube.com/user/hasslerforest
            http://www.france24.com/en/20110930-europe-district-kosovo-part1

  • Music Bus Goes Africa (2010-present)- Rwanda, Uganda

            Civil war in the African Great Lakes Area has devastated the daily lives of the region’s children. In 2010 and 2011 two MwB trainers laid the groundwork for new MwB work in the region. With local partner WE-ACTx, MwB is developing children’s music workshops, local youth trainings, a choral program, summer camps and work with women infected with HIV/ AIDS.
            http://musicbusgoesafrica.blogspot.com/
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNtrfcU_Esk
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SIjgZgmNl4

  • From Woman to Woman (2009- present)- Bosnia and Herzegovina, Rwanda

            From Woman to Woman is a three-year collaborative project that uses singing and dancing to aid the healing process in women who suffer from severe emotional problems and trauma in two recent conflict regions—Eastern Bosnia and Rwanda. Partners are Snaga Zene, providing medical and psycho-social support to women survivors in Bosnia; WE-ACTx, a Rwandan/US organization providing health care and support to women and children suffering from HIV/AIDS; and the War Trauma Foundation (NL). From             field experience, partners will develop tools needed to make the methodology available to others working with women in these and other conflict regions.
            http://www.musicianswithoutborders.org/p_woman.htm
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFsIq7texk8&feature=player_embedded

  • Stone Flowers, Rainbow Haven Singers, WAST, Musicians without Borders UK

            MwB’s UK associate brings asylum seekers and local residents together in Manchester neighborhoods      to sing each other’s songs and perform together in community choirs such as the Rainbow Haven Singers and WAST (Women Asylum Seekers Together).  In cooperation with the Medical Foundation of the Care of Victims of Torture, MwB UK leads ‘Stone Flowers’, a project using singing to support recovery processes by victims of torture.
            http://www.musicianswithoutborders.org.uk/#/uk-work/4549406258

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Musicians Without Borders
Address: Spoorstraat 38, 1815 BK Alkmaar, Netherlands
Phone:  011 31 725111653; cell 011 6 512 69 439
Contact Person: Laura Hassler, Director; Email:  l.hassler@musicianswithoutborders.org
SECTIONS: 
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
COUNTRIES: 
Multi-National: Canada, Switzerland, United States of America
PROJECT: 
EMPOWERING INDIVIDUALS AND COMMUNITIES THROUGH GROUP IMPROVISATION: MUSIC FOR PEOPLE

DESCRIPTION:
Founded in 1986, Music for People (MFP) is a not-for-profit organization that seeks to promote a humanistic approach to the way music is taught, performed and appreciated, using free improvisation as its medium. Music for People programs throughout the world are open to anyone at all levels of musical experience. MFP creates safe environments where people can play instruments and sing with no prerequisites to read notes or know a common musical vocabulary.
MFP’s philosophy is embodied in a “musical bill of rights”    (http://www.musicforpeople.org/rights.html) that profoundly respects the creative impulse in every person.  It differs from music schooling in two key ways: one, it uses free improvisation as the starting place for musical interactions, and most importantly, its work takes place in an atmosphere dedicated to encouragement and positive feedback.

Music for People’s training programs provide candidates with a curriculum in the fundamentals of music improvisation across musical styles that span ethnic cultures and time periods, and in the key elements of humanistic workshop facilitation. The goal is to empower individuals to spread music making as an activity everyone can take part in, starting with the communities in which they reside.  Its four-year training programs meet quarterly and place equal emphasis on musicianship development and workshop facilitation in small and large educational or therapeutic groups. The workshops are hosted in the USA and in Switzerland.

The basic activities of Music for People are summarized in the book Return to Child. Any combination of people can make music together.  Listening is the most important of all musical skills. In a social context, listening is mindfulness; it is sensitivity and awareness to what is around us. Listening is not just a perceptual skill to identify notes and rhythms, it is a key element of nonverbal social intelligence. Deep listening inspires authentic response, which is the key to making social connections with others. Imitation allows interaction through which players connect in sound, learning to blend, harmonize, contrast, support, stand out, be heard and be silent.  These musical skills foster and amplify the social awareness and mindfulness one needs to react appropriately in non-musical contexts.

The combination of musicianship training and leadership training, conducted in an atmosphere of deep respect for every person makes Music for People unique in its ability to inspire pedagogical and therapeutic approaches. Leaders with Music for People training can be found in music education classrooms, music therapy sessions, recreational music making, drum circles, rituals, and other forums where the power of music is used to focus group attention, provide transcendent meaning, and create a sense of community through bonding and fellowship.

CURRENT STATUS:
Music for People has graduated over 100 teachers who represent Music for People’s principles and techniques. Certified MFP teachers complete a four-year program of musicianship and leadership emphasizing the role of free improvisation in both contexts. The workshops take place mainly in the eastern United States (New York and Pennsylvania), with a sister program in Kiental, Switzerland. In addition, Music for People staff and graduates hold workshops throughout the USA and in several European countries. Its work expands through contributions from gifted educators, composers, therapists, and organizers.

Music for People is funded through individual payment for workshops and through private donations. Continued financial support is sought to sustain the growth of both the organization and its work, including its workshops, teacher certification program, and expanded member services. 

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
The laudatory testimonial information about Music for People is anecdotal rather than research-based.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.musicforpeople.org
www.returntochild.com
www.darlingconversations.com

Publications:
James Oshinsky (2008). Return to Child: Music for People’s Guide to Improvising Music and Authentic Group Leadership.  Return to Child describes Music for People’s improvisational techniques and its teaching philosophies for musicianship and leadership. This publication can be ordered from: http://www.returntochild.com/ All proceeds benefit Music for People.

The Darling Conversations (Producer, Clint Goss).  The Darling Conversations  comprise a 3-CD audio mini-class in Music for People philosophies and activities with cellist David Darling, Music for People co-founder and educator Julie Weber.  Published by: Manifest Spirit Records, 6 Fieldcrest Road, Westport, CT 06880-2628.  A portion of the sale supports the MFP organization.

Miller, Eric (2011). Bio-Guided Music Therapy: A Practitioner's Guide to the Clinical Integration of Music and Biofeedback.  Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Dr. Miller’s book summarizes brain research involving the participation of clients in improvisational and rhythmic entrainment activities, among other music therapy interventions.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization:  Music for People
Address:  P.O. Box 397, Goshen, CT  06756
Phone:  860-491-3763
Contact Person:  Bonnie Darling, Office Manager
Email: mfp@musicforpeople.org


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
COUNTRIES:
Guinea and United States of America
PROJECT:

SUPPORTING AND ENHANCING THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF HOMELESS CHILDREN AND CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: GROUP LAIENGEE PROJECT

 Please Refer to SECTION II, PAGE 132


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRIES:
Multi-National: Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Lucia
PROJECT:
MUSIC FOR SOCIAL CHANGE: OASIS-CARIBBEAN

DESCRIPTION:
Jamaica, St. Lucia and Haiti are the three beneficiaries of the orchestral and choral training program, the Organization of American States Orchestra Program operates in the Caribbean, also known as OASIS-Caribbean. OASIS was officially launched in October 2009 with a 10-day workshop for trainers in each country. In the first week of November 2009, 162 new musical instruments arrived in the newly established orchestra centers on each island.

In Kingston, Jamaica, the Orchestral Training Center was established in St. Andrew Technical High located in West Kingston; in Castries, St. Lucia, the Program is operating in Marchand, at the Marchand Elementary School; and in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the training center benefits Bél-Air and was established at the Ecole St. Trinité.

The program currently serves 270 children and youths from underprivileged neighborhoods in capitals of the three countries. It contributes to the prevention of violent behavior prevalent in these neighborhoods by redirecting the spare time of children and youths to an activity that takes advantage of their inherent strengths and talents. This is being achieved by implementing a systematic (5 days/week, 2 hours/day) orchestral and choral training program to complement intellectual and cultural growth and ultimately contributing to instilling civic values, increasing schooling retention levels, and creating future employment opportunities.

The program has adapted the School-Orchestra group teaching approach used by the renowned Venezuelan Youth Orchestra System and others. This group teaching approach ensures that participants get involved in joint activities from the very moment they enroll. There is early and continued exposure to great musical works and at the same time maintains continuous contact between beneficiaries and their community through frequent performances that ensure motivation and permanence in the program. 

CURRENT STATUS:
This OAS Program is coordinated by the OAS Art Museum of the Americas with support from National System of Youth Orchestras of Venezuela (FESNOJIV), Fundación Batuta of Colombia, and the Youth Orchestra of the Americas. Local partners for Jamaica are the Ministry of Education, the Edna Manley School of Music, and the recently created National Youth Orchestra of Jamaica; for St. Lucia, the Ministry for Social Transformation and the St. Lucia School of Music; and for Haiti, the Ecole de Musique Sainte Trinité, and Wyclef Jean’s Yéle Haiti.

OAS funding is for the first three years of the Program’s execution. The project will start the 3rd year of implementation in August 2011. After the third year, OAS support will end so agreements will be sought from the local public and private sectors to secure the program’s sustainability. The Program is also implementing a branding/marketing strategy via celebrity partnerships for promotion and fundraising, as it is happening with Haiti’s Wyclef Jean.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
The Program is implementing an evaluation program that will provide outcome data by June, 2011. Research is conducted by a team from the DePaul University in Chicago. The program will provide a mechanism to methodically verify the hypothesis that links youth orchestral training to social inclusion of youths at-risk by implementing a rigorous monitoring program throughout the execution phase and an evaluation of results at the end of the project, by August 2012. By the same time, it is expected that a manual containing an operational guide and an orchestral and choral training methodology with suggested repertoire will be ready for publication

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.museum.oas.org/oasis

Video:
http://vimeo.com/25465158

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Orchestras-of-the-Americas-for-Social-Inclusion-OASIS/117354544983973

Photos:
High definition pictures are available upon request.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: General Secretariat of the Organization of American States - Secretariat for External Relations, Art Museum of the Americas 
Address: 1889 F Street NW, Washington DC 20006, of 678 D
Contact Persons: Mariano Vales, Music Program Coordinator
Phone: (202) 458-3173, Fax: (202) 458-3673
Email: mvales@oas.org
Delfina Iervolino, Financial Manager
Phone:  (202) 458-6033, Fax: (202) 458-3673
Email: diervolino@oas.org


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Working with Trauma Survivors
clefCOUNTRIES:
Multi-National: Indonesia, Iraq, United States of America

PROJECT:
RECAPTURING CULTURAL IDENTITY THROUGH DRUMMING AND DRUM MAKING: DRUMS OF HUMANITY

DESCRIPTION:
Drums of Humanity was formed as a not-for-profit corporation in 2009 to promote healing for trauma survivors through drumming and drum making activities in areas recovering from war and natural disaster. The formation of this NGO came in conjunction with three international projects in Iraq, Indonesia, and with the Lost Boys of Sudan Center, U.S.A.

The immediate inspiration to form Drums of Humanity came from two working trips to Kurdistan, Iraq in 2008 and 2009. It was observed that the combination of drumming and instrument making was a powerful resource for those in need of reconnecting with their own culture and of healing from the emotional trauma and physical loss that they had experienced over many years. More than 300 people in Iraq have participated in these workshops and have learned to form new ways of expressing grief and finding peaceful connections with their former adversaries.

This approach was continued in Indonesia in 2009 with young people, educators and artists in Bantul, a region that was devastated by the May 27, 2006 earthquake. A U.S. State Department sponsored artistic team presented a wide range of music and instrument making projects and performances to young people, administrators and artists. The visit culminated in a presentation for the public.

Drum circles, and particularly instrument making, were used to effect positive change at the Lost Boys of Sudan Center in Phoenix, Arizona during 2009 and 2010. Young refugees from that country had relocated there after decades of civil war.

Drums of Humanity has centralized the management of three projects since then:

  • In Iraq, Kurdistan Save the Children teachers are trained and students shown how to make musical instruments for cultural and economic revitalization. At the Children's Rehabilitation Center in Kurdistan, demonstrations on making instrumental designs were provided to local craftsmen. Documented on film by the Institute for War and Peace Reporting in Iraq, the video and instruments are intended for use by therapists in treating clients with severe mental and physical challenges.

 

  • In Yogyakarta, Java, four American artists (2 dancers, 1 drummer and 1 instrument maker) made presentations to school assemblies for hundreds of students, professional development workshops with over 40 teachers, and hands-on sessions with 130 middle school students. Workshops included the making of drums and other percussion instruments, as well as stringed and wind instruments from around the world. This work connected young people and adults to their own culture through indigenous scales and rhythms.  Connections were also made to other cultures: for example, through the West African plucked kalimba, the Native American Lakota drum and the Middle Eastern santur.
  • With the Lost Boys of Sudan Center, the use and making of the rebabba was restored. This traditional lyre, found among the Nuba, Dinka, and Nuer peoples, was traditionally made by young people as a rite of passage to adulthood. However, during the many years of conflict this part of their cultural heritage had been denied. To assist in restoring the rebabba's music, a simple design was presented along with tools and materials to make this type of lyre. The goal is to bring the rebabba back for use in composition and performance. Songs of the Lost Sudanese Boys have been sung in both Arabic and Dinka, two languages of Sudanese warring factions. This has empowered young people to tell the story of what it was like to grow up during the civil war.

 

CURRENT STATUS:
Continued work in Kurdistan is in the planning stages for 2012. A Drums of Humanity program extension to Baghdad and elsewhere in the country is currently being considered.

In Indonesia the teacher/student exchange has become a model of positive relationships. The American drum circle approach has combined with the local colotomic (layered) rhythmic structure to become somewhat of a unique artistic expression. Programs continue in Yogyakarta and plans are being made to return.

With the new country of South Sudan being established on July 9, 2011, a visit is planned to the area to assist with cultural rehabilitation through the development of musical instruments indigenous to the region.

Funds for the Iraq trips came from: NAMM, the International Music Products Association; the Rex Foundation; a private donor; and Ethnomusic, Inc. Funding for the Daf in Iraq publication came from the nonprofit Percussion Marketing Council. Funding for the trips to Indonesia came from a US State Department grant. Funding for work with the Lost Boys came from Ethnomusic, Inc.

Drums of Humanity is awaiting the 501(c)(3) status, expected by October 2011.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
In all three locations, participants gave feedback about the effectiveness of the training and over 90% said these programs were very helpful. Narrative interviews, communications and final reports demonstrated that participants were highly appreciative of the experience, noting that it improved both their mental and physical well-being.  

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.EthnomusicInc.com
http://playdrums.com
http://www.ksc-kcf.org/
http://iwpr.net
http://www.wac.ucla.edu/cip/
http://www.azlostboyscenter.org/

Publications:
http://jakarta.usembassy.gov/pr_02122009_2.html
http://www.rootsofrhythm.net/documents/ROR_SpecialEdition-FINAL-lo.pdf

 

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Drums of Humanity
Address: 17950 Geauga Lake Road, Chagrin Falls, Ohio 44023-2210
Phone: 440-725-8767 and Fax: 440-543-2963
Contact Person: Dr. Craig Woodson
E-mail: craigw@drumsofhumanity.org or woodsonphd@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRIES:
South Africa, United States of America
PROJECT:

DIVERSION FROM CRIME INTO MUSIC EDUCATION: EMPOWERING JUVENILE OFFENDERS THROUGH MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS

DESCRIPTION:
The DIME program endeavors to balance (i) young people's appreciation of music and (ii) their striving for artistic excellence with (iii) a process that respects the development of the whole child. Its approach is student-centered, not performance-centered. While performing offers valuable benefits to the children involved in this program, emphasis is placed on the process rather than the product. When children are referred to the DIME program, they join an African marimba and djembe band and are provided with regular group music instruction and performance opportunities. Musical instruments are chosen for several reasons: they are a part of the children’s cultural heritage. A simple, but impressive level of accomplishment can be achieved in a group setting within a relatively short period, providing the children with a strong sense of accomplishment. The act of hitting the marimbas and djembes requires a fair amount of physical exertion that children appear to find both natural and stress relieving.

The DIME program was initiated as a collaboration among the University of South Florida (USA), the University of the Western Cape (South Africa), and various organizations within the cities of Tampa and Cape Town. The DIME program targets children in conflict with the law. It aims to empower them by enhancing their capabilities and skills thereby aiding them in achieving successful reintegration into the community. The program provides them with positive personal, social, and cultural opportunities.

CURRENT STATUS:
The three-year project was suspended after funding came to an end, with the hope of reopening again in the future with new funding.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Woodward, S.C., Sloth-Nielson, J. and Mathiti, V. (2008).  South Africa, the arts, and youth in conflict with the law.  International Journal of Community Music, Volume 1 (1), 69 – 88.      (Hard copy edition).
Woodward, S.C. and Pestano C. (2010) Youth At-Risk: Reaching children falling outside sociallyaccepted norms. In: D. J. Elliott and K. Veblen (eds) Community Music today. Oxford University Press (in Press).
Woodward, S. C. (2007) Producer, Director, Script Writer.  Diversion into Music Education:  A program for Juvenile Offenders. A DVD documentary by Media Innovations. Not published, copies available for educational use only.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Thornton School of Music
Address: University of Southern California, 3470 Trousdale Parkway, WPH 302b,
            Los Angeles, California 90089-0851
Phone: 213-740-3011; Fax: 213-821-1865
Contact Person: Sheila C. Woodward Ph.D., Chair, Music Education Department
Email: swoodwar@usc.edu