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Children and Young People with
Special Needs: The Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre

New Zealand: Music Therapy Services for Children and Young People with
Special Needs: The Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre

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MUSIC FOR MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH

SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
South Africa
PROJECT:
MUSIC WITH DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN SUFFERING TRAUMATIC EFFECTS OF THEIR ENVIRONMENT: MUSIC FOR LIFE PROJECT OF THE MUSIC THERAPY COMMUNITY CLINIC

DESCRIPTION:
The Music for Life Project of The Music Therapy Community Clinic (MTCC) began in 2002 when two music therapists started offering music therapy sessions to school children in Heideveld, which is a suburb of Cape Town on the Cape Flats. It was created in 1950 by the Group Areas Act of the apartheid government and is home to many historically disadvantaged people. The effects of gang violence, unemployment, substance abuse, dysfunctional families and poverty are extremely damaging, especially to children. South Africa has a rich and varied musical heritage, making music a powerful tool when working in disadvantaged communities. Music therapy is a clinical service that addresses therapeutic needs, thus effecting positive changes in targeted communities.

The children deal with their trauma through various musical activities such as singing, musical storytelling, song writing, musical movement and instrumental improvisation. Children are given opportunities to relate to one another in a safe environment where every child is valued and supported.
The MTCC’s Music for Life Project offers services in two ways:

  • Individual music therapy sessions are provided to children referred by caregivers for reasons such as bereavement (gang-related, HIV/AIDS or other), witnessing violence, being the victim of physical, emotional or sexual abuse and absentee parents as a result of abandonment or jail.
  • Music groups facilitated by staff members such as Marimba groups, drumming groups and a choir. The children also perform in the Annual Heideveld Community Concert and attend a Music for Life camp.

CURRENT STATUS:
During 2010, the MTCC critically reviewed the way it works and five programs were developed. These programs include:

  • Music for Life Program
  • Babies Program
  • Early Childhood Development Program
  • Youth Program
  • Music Therapy Program

The MTCC has also begun developing new partnerships with various community organisations whose missions align with theirs.

A new system has been created (Pathways/Hand to Hand) in order to support and guide the children once their music therapy process is completed. This system aims to provide continued, individual-specific referrals and assistance going into the future.

There is also continuing training of Community Musicians and Creative Music Facilitators from within the communities who work under guidance and supervision of the music therapists.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Various methods are undertaken to assess the impact of the work and these include:

  • Reflection and evaluation meetings to ascertain the effectiveness of the work
  • Interviews with beneficiaries and caregivers undertaken by a narrative therapist
  • Feedback from parents, teachers, doctors, staff and the children themselves

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.music-therapy.ORG.za

Publications:
Dos Santos, A. & Oosthuisen, H. (2010). Taking music seriously, M. Pavlicevic (Ed.), South Africa: MTCC Publications.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Music Therapy Community Clinic
Address: 44 Roseville Road, CLAREMONT, 7708, Cape Town, South Africa;
            Postal address: P O Box 2069, CLAREINCH, 7740, South Africa
Phone/Fax: +27 (0) 216715196
Contact Persons:
Sunelle Fouche, Executive Director; E-mail: sunelle@music-therapy.org.za
Alexanne Tingley, Operations Manager; Email: alexanne@music-therapy.org.za


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Argentina
PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS IN NEUROREHABILITATION:  THE INSTITUTE OF COGNITIVE NEUROLOGY

DESCRIPTION:
The Institute of Cognitive Neurology (INECO) serves children and adults with a wide range of developmental, degenerative and acquired neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions such as stroke, acquired brain injury, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, cognitive disorders, developmental and autistic spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, trauma and anxiety disorders, among others.

The Music Therapy Program was established in 2008 as part of the Department of Neuropsychology of INECO. Currently, the music therapy program provides individual, family, group and community sessions as well as home care and outreach services. The music therapy team provides a broad scope of treatments for individuals, families and caregivers throughout the Institute within a comprehensive interdisciplinary team of neurologists, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, physical, speech and occupational therapists.

Based on the idea that there is an inborn musical sensitivity in all human beings, music therapy is seen as an essential part of treatment and a key aspect of patients’ motor, cognitive, occupational, emotional and social rehabilitation. A creative and constructive social environment is created to help attain personalized treatment goals through music making.

The music therapy team offers:

  • State-of-the-art treatment including Nordoff-Robbins Creative Music Therapy, music-neuro-rehabilitation techniques and medical music-psychotherapy in individual, group, and family sessions
  • Music-assisted speech and music-assisted movement sessions using vocal and instrumental improvisations to stimulate, maintain and restore speech and motor skills
  • Music therapy groups for young adults with developmental impairments, for the elderly with cognitive impairments, and for adults with stroke or traumatic brain injury 
  • The Instrumental Ensemble that promotes social and occupational rehabilitation for

patients with neuropsychiatric conditions by hosting events such as live music karaoke sessions that are open to the community

CURRENT STATUS:
The program is funded through both Foundation and private donations. Affiliated with the Institute of Neuroscience at Favaloro University, the music therapy team:

  • Provides specialized training in music therapy foundations and techniques for experienced clinicians and related health professionals in the field of neurological rehabilitation
  • Provides presentations to the community
  • Hosts international symposiums and workshops on relevant topics in the field of music therapy
  • Is involved in professional writing and research in collaboration with doctors, physical and speech therapists in the areas of minimally conscious state, Alzheimer’s disease, and speech and movement disorders

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.ineco.org.ar

Publications:
Lichtensztejn, M. (2009). Música y medicina: La aplicación especializada de la música en el área de la
salud.  Buenos Aires: Ediciones Elemento.

Lichtensztejn, M. (2009). The clinical use of piano with patients suffering breathing distress related to
pain. In (Azoulay & Loewy eds.) Music, the Breath & Health: Advances in Integrative Music Therapy,
New York: Satchnote Press.

Lichtensztejn, M. (In press). El cerebro musical: Música y aprendizaje. In (INECO – UdeSa Eds.) El
cerebro en el aula. Buenos Aires: Editorial Aique.

Lichtensztejn, M., Macchi, P. (In press). Notas musicales en la infancia temprana. In Cómo favorecer un
desarrollo saludable en los niños”. Buenos Aires: Editorial Bonum.
 
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Fundación INECO – Instituto de Neurología Cognitiva Music Therapy Program
Address: Pacheco de Melo 1854/60, Buenos Aires, Argentina - 1426
Phone: +54 11 4812-0010
Contact Person: Marcela Lichtensztejn, MT-BC, NRMT, LCAT
Email: mlichtensztejn@ineco.org.ar


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY: 
Brazil
PROJECT: 
SONGS TO HELP SAY GOOD-BYE:  MUSIC THERAPY IN PALLIATIVE CARE

DESCRIPTION:
In Brazil there is a lack of knowledge related to palliative care. Consequently, residents receive very poor assistance at the end of life. Founded in 2007, Casa do Cuidar Association addresses this need by providing education in palliative care to healthcare professionals, consultation to hospitals interested in developing palliative care assistance and palliative care services to patients who are suffering from a serious illness.   

Casa do Cuidar Association seeks to ensure quality of life for patients and families coping with a serious or life-threatening illness and help them manage end of life related symptoms within a holistic framework.  To achieve this mission, the Association offers “Songs to Help Say Goodbye” – a specialized music therapy program for patients and families receiving palliative care services.  Sessions typically occur once a week in a home-based setting.  Supported and facilitated by a music therapist, patients and families compose and share songs that are meaningful for them in their process of anticipatory grief.  This creative songwriting experience comforts patients and their families on all levels, including the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual.

  • Physical – In spite of good pain management, patients can feel uncomfortable at the end of life.  Music can assist in multiple ways such as facilitating breathing and helping patients to focus on images supported by music that soothes them.
  • Psychological – Patients are immersed in a difficult journey, searching for meaning, ways of coping and inner strength.  Songs can help patients cope with difficult moments, giving them words when they cannot find the words themselves.  In cases where the patients struggles to express their feelings, music enters as a non-threatening way of reflecting about death and dying issues such as fears, unresolved situations, coping skills, and a need for hope.
  • Social –When a patient loses his ability to communicate because of the progression of a disease, music enables the patient to stay connected to family and friends.  Families also emphasize how music comforts and helps them to be present and connected to their loved ones, even after their death.
  • Spiritual – Songs with religious messages can bring hope and support to patients and families during the transition from life to death.

 CURRENT STATUS:
Casa do Cuidar Association is a not-for-profit organization that relies on private donations and volunteers for its funding.  Since 2007, palliative care courses have been offered to health care professionals, including nurses, doctors, physical therapists, psychologists, nutritionists and music therapists, among others. “Songs to Help Say Goodbye” began in early 2010 and has since offered music therapy services to patients and their families.

 RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Casa do Cuidar Association currently evaluates its program through a questionnaire given to patients’ families.  All music therapy sessions are documented in the patient’s file and are accessible to other healthcare professionals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.casadocuidar.org.br
http://www.casadocuidar.org.br/site/socios/cristiane-ferraz-prade.html

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Casa do Cuidar Association
Address: Rua Tabapuã, 649, cj 26 Itaim Bibi, São Paulo-SP, BRAZIL
Phone: 55-11-30785202
Contact Person: Cristiane Ferraz Prade
Email: cristiane@casadocuidar.org.br 


 SECTION:     
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Chile
PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY WITH WOMEN IN A COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER

DESCRIPTION:
In 2006, the Barnechea Health Center in the city of Santiago offered for the first time, music therapy groups in a community-based initiative. Its beneficiaries were low-income women, with limited formal education, ranging in ages between 35 and 70.The objectives of the group were to overcome depression, panic attacks, adjustment disorders, family violence and other posttraumatic stress reactions experienced by survivors of the recent Chilean earthquake.

Music played a key role in the therapeutic process through free improvisations, the use of familiar songs and melodies, and music and relaxation techniques. Stringed, percussion, and wind instruments were used. These simple instruments were easy to use and allowed clients, without previous knowledge of music, to play them. The goal was to promote an understanding of the disturbing inner emotions of these women by finding ways to channel them creatively.

CURRENT STATUS:
A follow-up study was done after the conclusion of the first music therapy group that ended in 2009. The women have continued to meet twice a month on their own. This group has become a self-help group, providing the women with a social network, solidarity and relief in difficult times. They have continued to increase their knowledge of various topics by researching areas of interest and then making presentations to their peers.

As a result of this project, two other music therapy initiatives have been started designed to help sensitize health care workers, physiotherapists and support staff who serve the public. The goal is to develop improved self-care techniques as well as outlets for their work related stress through music.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Through questionnaires collected at the beginning of the music therapy treatment and then at the end of twelve sessions, client response was evaluated. It was reported that the clients perceived these music therapy groups as an important improvement in their quality of life, increased self-esteem, decreased levels of anxiety, and improved development of creativity and self-care. These reports also found that the social interaction promoted by the music therapy groups was an effective way to overcome loneliness and to increase tolerance for frustration.

CONTACT INFORMATION:                                                                             
Organization: Barnechea Health Center
Address: Centro de Salud – COSAM, Municipalidad de Lo Barnechea, Chile
Phone: (562)-7573381 
Contact Person: Paulina Cortes, Music Therapist
E-mail: pcg@movistar.cl


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Colombia
PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY FOR CHILDREN WITH NEUROLOGIC DISORDERS

DESCRIPTION:
The music therapy program at the Instituto Colombiano de Neurociencias (ICN) has been offering individual music therapy sessions for patients with different neurologic disorders since 2004. The ICN is a private institution offering outpatient services in the city of Bogota for over twenty years. It serves patients with learning disabilities and neurological disorders such as Down’s syndrome, cerebral palsy and autism spectrum disorders.

All therapists at ICN work within a neuropsychological framework. Individual sessions are offered in areas such as music therapy, speech therapy, neuropsychology, neurology and psychology. An average of 40-50 patients are seen each week, although not all patients are seen in music therapy. ICN also does an evaluation of the patients learning processes and advises several education institutions regarding mainstream programs in regular education. Most of the patients attend regular schools, and go to their therapies at the institute throughout the week.

After a patient is referred to music therapy by other services at the Center, an individual music therapy plan is developed. Usually children participate in individual sessions once or twice a week. Music is used in various ways according to the individual goals and objectives. Some of the specific goals include the use music for self-regulation, developing means of communication, improving the understanding of verbal language, increasing the use of spoken language, increasing social interaction, decreasing aggressive behaviors and improving thought processes.  Children having trouble with bilingual education can also be helped by music therapy. Music experiences include improvisation, composition and both vocal and instrumental recreation..  Mostly the music repertoire of the clients is used. That includes children’s music, pop, rock and also popular tropical rhythms such as tropi-pop or reggaeton. As goals are accomplished, the program is adjusted or terminated according to the needs of the child. 

In Colombia the law requires that schools have mainstream programs for children with disabilities. Every child should be in a regular school, using adaptations as needed. The ICN works with several schools, especially those that our patients attend, in order to make the education work in the best way possible for children, their classmates, and teachers. The music therapist participates and coordinates some of the institution’s consulting projects throughout the city. The goal is to make music an integral part of mainstreaming programs in schools. The music therapist demonstrates how music is a powerful tool to help facilitate learning, to increase self-esteem and promote the acceptance of the other children that is necessary for a school community to have success with this mainstream philosophy. 
 
CURRENT STATUS:
The program is currently working according to its objectives. It serves around ten patients each week and also provides assessments and evaluations. It is staffed by one music therapist who is an integral part of the institution’s team, participating also in the different consulting projects to outside institutions.
The program is funded by the participants in the program paying a fee per session.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.neurociencias.org.co
Publications can be found on the website.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Instituto Colombiano de Neurociencias
Address: Carrera 64 #98-26 Bogota, Colombia
Phone: (571) 2530004
Contact Person: Juanita Eslava
Email: neurociencias@telmex.net.co


SECTIONS:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefCOUNTRY:
Costa Rica

PROJECT:
A LATIN PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE FOR SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN: ENSAMBLE DE PERCUSIÓN INCLUSIÓN

DESCRIPTION:
The project began in 2000 as a way to provide the opportunity for music learning and performance to students from age five to forty with Asperger or Down syndromes, autism, cerebral palsy, and hearing impairments, among other conditions and syndromes at the Music School of Mercedes located in the mostly rural northern province of Heredia. The objective of the program is to promote the expressive and creative musical potential of these people with special needs through a Latin percussion workshop.  At every session, the students are guided into full, sequenced group activities as a percussion ensemble. They learn percussion performance techniques, especially Latin percussion (i.e. samba, meringue, and salsa), in accordance to their physical capacities. In addition, the students are also encouraged to explore their potential as musicians and team members. Confidence, perseverance, and creativity are only some of the pivotal values developed in the learning and performing processes.

Since the outset of the project, the ensemble director foresaw the need to transcend formal music learning in order to stimulate the performing and expressive potential of students. Becoming an independent ensemble contributed to achieving this goal. The ensemble director reports a significant improvement in physical skills (i.e. motor coordination) mental health (i.e. concentration skills, confident and optimistic attitudes, positive self-image) and social skills (i.e. communication with peers) in students, and overall a more productive life.

CURRENT STATUS:
The ensemble has presented almost 300 concerts in schools, universities, government institutions, churches, throughout the country. Despite its success, the program still requires funding, material, and logistical support to continue carrying out its work.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.aldia.cr/ad_ee/2004/octubre/24/sociedad0.html

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Contact Person: Professor Enrique Aguilar-Ruiz
Phone: + (506) 2237-7434 / + (506) 8387-1463


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
MENTAL STIMULATION AND SOCIALIZATION THROUGH DRUMMING FOR PEOPLE WITH EARLY STAGE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: MEMORY DRUMMERS

DESCRIPTION:
Drumming can be a meaningful and engaging activity that combines mental stimulation and socialization for people with diagnosed or undiagnosed early stage memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease. “Memory Drummers” serves people who have the capacity to follow instructions and participate in a group activity with minimal supervision.

This program was started in 2008.  It was funded through a U.S. Administration on Aging demonstration grant and was one of the “Empowerment Groups” for people with early stage memory loss offered through the Missouri chapters of the Alzheimer’s Association. The St. Louis chapter opted to offer these groups in partnership with adult day programs. They hope to introduce people with dementia and their families to adult day services early in the progress of the disease and encourage adult day programs to offer early-stage appropriate programming. Music appreciation, chiming and drumming were among a variety of offerings made available at local adult day program sites. The groups are led by music therapists. 

The drumming members chose to become a performing group and named themselves the “Memory Drummers.” The Alzheimer’s Association, St. Louis Chapter, decided to adopt this program as its own, making it a part of their standard chapter service offerings for people with early stage memory loss. It is currently funded through a combination of donations, fees and general revenue support. The group has given several performances. Memory Drummers have already performed at the St. Louis Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk and at the St. Louis Science Center. The Memory Drumming program was also the focus of a pre-conference symposium at the National American Music Therapy Association’s National Conference in 2008, at which group members were co-presenters and performers.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Memory Drummers function as a part of the Early Stage program of the Alzheimer’s Association, St. Louis chapter. By keeping the cost for participants low, the program should attract individuals from all economic means. The current program does not focus on therapeutic outcomes, but on the program’s success in offering an opportunity for meaningful activity, engagement and socialization. The impact of the program as a respite opportunity for family caregivers is very important. The program also expects to serve as a vehicle for promoting Alzheimer’s awareness within the community.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://videos.stltoday.com/p/video?id=2382561

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Alzheimer’s Association, St. Louis Chapter
Address: 9370 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO, 63132
Phone: 314-801-0420 or 1-800-272-3900; Fax: 314-801-0372
Contact person: Deb Bryer, R.N., Early Stage Coordinator
Email: debra.bryer@alzstl.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
MUSIC AND WELLNESS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON STRESS REDUCTION AND PAIN MANAGEMENT: PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

DESCRIPTION:
The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s (PSO) Music and Wellness Program positions PSO musicians as a resource to patients, families and healthcare staff in Western Pennsylvania. The musicians work with the music therapy department of The Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh to offer both live and recorded music of the highest artistic quality to families, children and hospital staff designed to reduce stress, promote healing and improve general well-being. The impact of a child’s illness can affect parents, siblings, extended family members, and care givers. Music and Wellness sessions seek to decrease anxiety and pain, increase coping skills, provide a venue for self-expression, soothe and enhance spiritual support, develop familial support, allow for cognitive sensory stimulation and offer a sense of normalization. More than twenty-two PSO musicians are active participants in the program. Sessions range from one to five musicians depending on the situation and the needs being addressed. Instrumentation is also adapted for each circumstance.

CURRENT STATUS:
The role of the PSO at Children’s Hospital has grown, in part, due to the Orchestra’s reputation for assisting with community traumas. There is now an ongoing relationship with Gilda’s Club, adult oncology units in other local hospitals and hospice care agencies. A new relationship has begun with the Fox Chapel VA campus which deals with recovery (substance abuse and homelessness issues). In September 2011 the program is expanding into the admissions area.

Orchestra members have the skills and repertoire to play at large community-wide events as well as one-on-one. They have played for an audience of approximately 2,500 at a memorial service for victims of 9-11 and a memorial for fallen police offers attended by 17,000.

In addition to playing, musicians also frequently make presentations in many locations throughout Western Pennsylvania on how to use music for stress reduction and pain management. Other orchestras including the St. Louis Symphony, and the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra's creating Music and Wellness programs and modeling them after the PSO’s program.

Funding for music and wellness program is through the education and community projects department of the PSO.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Publications:
A New Avenue for Musicians’ Outreach: Music and Wellness
http://www.polyphonic.org/harmony/15/Music_Wellness_Brill.pdf
Post- Op Opera: Music helps surgery patients recover. July 2009
tp://www.miller-mccune.com/blogs/news-blog/music-helps-patients-recover-3586/
The hope of music’s healing powers. March 2010
http://articles.latimes.com/2010/mar/01/health/la-he-0301-brain-music-therapy-20100301
Playing along with the Mozart effect. March 2010
http://articles.latimes.com/2010/mar/01/health/la-he-0301-brain-music-20100301

Parade magazine: Healing sick kids through music. April 2010
http://www.parade.com/news/what-america-cares-about/featured/100404-healing-sick-kids-through-music.html
Music sets beat for heart and lungs. June 2009
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090622163025.htm
Musical surgeon examines the OR soundtrack. December 2009
http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2009/12/07/musical_surgeon_examines_the_or_soundtrac/
Violist inspires others. March 2010
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10083/1045063-114.stm
Medscape: Music lowers anxiety and boosts mood in cancer patients. August 12, 2011
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/747948

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
Address:  Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Phone: 412.781.5450; 412.392.2882
Contact Person: Penny Brill, Violist and Program Founder
Email: pabrill@yahoo.com
Suzanne Perrino, Senior Vice-President of Education and Strategic Implementation
Email: SPerrino@pittsburghsymphony.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America
PROJECT: 
MUSIC THERAPY FOR AT-RISK PARENTING: LULLABY 101

DESCRIPTION:
In 1966, The Music Settlement of Cleveland was the first community music school in the country to establish a music therapy program. Numerous individuals with a variety of disabilities and diagnoses have been served over the course of its history. Music Therapists see clients at the University Circle campus and are assigned to various outreach contractual arrangements in either social service, medical, or educational organizations. The Lullaby 101 program began in 2007, with services geared to teen parents, parents with depression or other mental illnesses, parents of low socioeconomic status and parents of children at-risk. Parents served have been from age 15 years on up. 

Singing to infants is considered a universal caregiving behavior. Singing lullabies calms babies and facilitates a relaxation response in mothers that can help them cope with the demands of motherhood. An approach called “infant-directed singing” is one of the foundational tenets for this program. This involves working with a mother/caregiver to learn how to better respond to her baby’s behaviors to music. This results in babies learning basic strategies to effectively interact with their environment. Teen mothers who are less likely to know healthy ways of stimulating their babies, can be taught to recognize and become more sensitive to babies’ cues. Depressed mothers and their infants are more likely to experience insecure attachment. Infants of depressed mothers show physiological signs of chronic stress. These findings are all part of the rationale for offering music therapy groups for mothers who are at-risk.

Lullaby 101’s goals include articulation of how parents use music presently in their lives; defining a criteria for choosing calming music for babies; increasing lullaby repertoire; recognition and response to signs of babies’ fussing/distress, overstimulation, calm/relaxation and contentment; applying or utilizing skills and repertoire learned in class at home with their babies; decreasing parents’ sense of personal anxiety; and maintaining or increasing use of music as a tool for self-expression, coping, and/or inspiration.

Music is used in a variety of ways including music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation; song/ lyric discussion providing opportunities to discuss hopes, dreams, challenges and support; interactive singing where participants learn/review lullabies or songs of their kin from a variety of cultures; interactive instrument playing in which participants may accompany lullabies or songs utilized for discussion; song-writing of original lyrics and/or melodies for personalized lullabies; and making recordings where participants choose selections, their order, and the type of accompaniment either they or the music therapist make.  

Since the inception of this program, The Music Settlement has partnered with numerous social service and medical agencies to reach the parents who may benefit. These have included Help Me Grow, Options for Families and Youth, St. Martin de Porres Center, Merrick House, Moms First and Connections Women’s Maternal Mental Health Clinic.

CURRENT STATUS:
Lullaby 101 is financed by a combination of sources, such as United Way, foundation grants and hourly fees charged by The Music Settlement for services to partnering outreach agencies. The program will continue in 2011-12, most notably with a research project with mothers with depression and other mental illnesses in a partnership with a Board Certified Music Therapist, psychiatrist and other staff at Connections Women’s Maternal Mental Health Clinic.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
In a survey of participants conducted by the program, positive changes in relaxation were reported for both teen parents and parents with depression or other mental illness. Additionally, both post-surveys and follow-up surveys of teen parents indicated less anxiety, greater relaxation, and a feeling of being more able to care for their babies.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.thecmss.org/index.aspx?page=therapy

Publications:
Hatters-Friedman, S., Kaplan, R. S., Rosenthal, M. B., & Console, P. (2010). Music Therapy in Perinatal Psychiatry:  Use of Lullabies for Pregnant and Postpartum Women with Mental Illness, Music and Medicine, 2 (4), 219-225.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization:  The Music Settlement
Address: 11125 Magnolia Drive, Cleveland, OH 44106
Phone:  216.421.5806, ext. 142; Fax:  216.231.5007
Contact Person:  Ronna Kaplan, MA, MT-BC, Director, Department of Music Therapy
Email:  rkaplan@themusicsettlement.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America
PROJECT: 
MUSIC THERAPY FOR INDIVIDUALS IN RECOVERY: LEARNING IN LAYERS

DESCRIPTION:
In 1966, the Music Settlement of Cleveland was the first community music school in the country to establish a music therapy program. Many individuals with a variety of disabilities and diagnoses have been served in the course of its history. One of their programs, Learning in Layers, is designed to work with men who have a history of criminal behavior and multifaceted problems including drug and alcohol addiction and recidivism. The program is designed to improve in gradual increments, the daily coping skills of former convicts who are re-entering the community through a combination of educational and psychotherapeutic intervention strategies. In six weeks of structured treatment, each person attends a variety of groups including informational classes, AA meetings, cognitive behavior therapy sessions, discussion groups, life skills workshops, spiritual development counseling and music therapy. 

Music is used to promote:

  • Physical benefits through the use of relaxation techniques in working with anger and symptom management
  • Educational benefits through the understanding of basic structures of music, such as learning how to problem solve and make decisions
  • Emotional stability by helping to explore and identify feelings and self-awareness through lyric interpretation
  • Social interaction by developing better communication skills, relationship building and leadership skills through the use of drum circles, music listening, and hand chime ensembles

CURRENT STATUS:
Learning in Layers is financed through a combination of foundation support and hourly fees charged by The Music Settlement for services to partnering outreach agencies. The project is ongoing as new individuals continually enroll.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Through pre- and post- program surveys completed at the beginning and end of the 6-week program period, participants are asked to self-assess across a number of life skill categories. The data is then compared to evaluate program effectiveness across these assessment areas. During the past three years, the music therapist has collected data on over 200 clients. The results indicate a high satisfaction rate. Participant reports are also compiled in narrative form as well.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.thecmss.org/

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Music Settlement
Address: 11125 Magnolia Drive, Cleveland, OH 44106
Phone:  216-421-5806, ext. 142; Fax:  216-231-5007
Contact Persons: Ronna Kaplan, Director, Department of Music Therapy or
Patty Console, Clinical Music Therapist
Email:  rkaplan@themusicsettlement.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America
PROJECT: 

MUSIC THERAPY IN A LARGE URBAN MEDICAL CENTER: THE LOUIS ARMSTRONG CENTER FOR MUSIC AND MEDICINE

DESCRIPTION:
The Louis Armstrong Music Therapy Department at Beth Israel Medical Center in NYC has provided a broad range of services throughout two medical centers in Manhattan and within the community for the last eighteen years. The mission ensures that the staff provides state-of-the-art care and integrates music with medical treatment. The program is a full in-hospital, out-patient and community-based program that services a variety of populations. Music medicine and music therapy is used throughout the hospital to enhance, restore or change medical, physical and/or psychosocial functioning. The team is trained to offer the most current music medicine and music psychotherapy treatment including clinical improvisation, music meditation, pain management, sedation, end-of-life, and breathing modalities. The music therapists conduct daily sessions with patients in many areas of the hospital: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), Pediatrics, Family Medicine, Maternity, Oncology, Intensive Care Units, Peter Kruger Clinic for Infants, Children and Teens with HIV,  Orthopedics, Hospice, Pain Medicine and Palliative Care, and the Sickle Cell Disease Unit (all programs described in depth on website).  Innovative programs include:

  • Music for Advances in Respiration (AIR) - Music therapy is used to address the physical symptoms of pulmonary disease, including techniques to enhance breathing and cope with symptoms such as dyspnea, as well as providing psychosocial support for people coping with chronic illness to enhance quality of life. The program is free and sponsored by the Grammy Foundation Grant Program.
  • Music for Cardiac Advances in Rehabilitation (CAIR) - Music therapy is used to address the physical symptoms of cardiovascular disease, including techniques to regulate heart rate and blood pressure, as well as providing psychosocial support for people coping with chronic illness to enhance quality of life. Music-assisted relaxation and guided imagery are used to influence heart rhythms, optimize breathing and support stress management.
  • Asthma Initiative Program (AIP) - helps children and teens with asthma in the school or community environments using music visualization and winds (recorders and flutes).
  • The Music & Health Clinic serves the unique health care needs of musicians and performing artists, linking performance-related ailments to medical and clinical music therapy services. The unique team consists of a medical director, a team of music therapists and specialized doctors who can attend to the physical and emotional needs of the musician and performing artist. The Clinic additionally serves children and teens with emotional issues such as PDD, ADHD, conduct disorders, eating disorders and phobias.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Program is made possible through a generous grant from the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, Inc., with additional funding from other public and private donors. The music therapy team is comprised of six music therapists, a medical director (MD), ten music therapy interns carefully selected from universities across the USA and a music therapy endowed ‘fellow’. Training is provided for international students during the summer. The team sees about 3100 patients per year in individual, group or family sessions.  Currently underway is a new NICU international training program entitled: Rhythm, Breath and Lullaby (RBL) that is supported by Remo and the Heather on Earth Foundations. The program is affiliated with New York University, Hahnemann Creative Arts in Therapy Program at Drexel, Molloy College, the International Association for Music and Medicine and the American Music Therapy Association.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
The mission of the program includes conducting research and publishing material to further advance the care provided to our patients and enhance the practice of medical music therapy. The team conducts research in conjunction with doctors and nurses, providing the utmost care and attention to the patients and families served. Current ongoing research projects involve mixed designs which provide for quantitative and qualitative data collections. The studies include:

Heather on Earth Multi-site Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Study
The music therapy team led research in 10 hospitals in a study investigating the effects of music therapy interventions for premature infants. This two-year project explored the use of live music with premature infants diagnosed with respiratory distress syndrome, clinical sepsis and/or small for gestational age
diagnoses. This study is completed.            
Clinical Music Improvisation in Chemotherapy Study
In the Helen Sawaya Research Project at St Luke's Roosevelt music therapists are investigating the impact of live music-drumming and clinical music improvisation, as well as vocal and song writing experiences in resiliency of receiving infusion therapy. This study is ongoing.
The Effects of Music Therapy in the Recovery of Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery

Music therapists are measuring the effects of live music applications in pain and recovery of spinal patients. This study is ongoing.
Music Therapy and the Effects of Noise in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU)

As noise is a reported hazard affecting medical error as well as a hospital’s capacity to maintain a healing environment, a research study is measuring staff, patient and caregivers' impressions of noise in the SICU with no music and after environmental music interventions are offered. This study is ongoing.
Music Therapy during Simulation in Radiation Therapy
This study is researching the use of music psychotherapy sessions and music programs for patients undergoing radiation therapy for newly diagnosed cancer. Patient preferred music is identified and programs structured to meet the needs of their level of traumatic experience. This study is ongoing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
musicandmedicine.org
iammonline.com

Published materials under publications link on website, iammonline.com
Dr. Joanne Loewy is the co-Editor in Chief of the International Journal ‘Music & Medicine’
published by SAGE (sagepub.com).

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Louis Armstrong Center for Music & Medicine
Address: Beth Israel Medical Center, 6 Silver 21, First Avenue at 16th St., New York, NY 10003
            Phone: 212 420-3484 and Fax: 212 420-2726
Contact Person: Dr. Joanne Loewy, Director
Email: JLoewy@chpnet.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY IN CANCER CARE: MEMORIAL SLOAN-KETTERING CANCER CENTER

DESCRIPTION:
Since its founding in 1884, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) in New York City has played a leadership role in defining the standard of care for patients with cancer. MSK’s mission is the progressive control and cure of cancer through programs of research, patient care, and education. MSK is the oldest and largest private institution for cancer care in the world: MKS includes a 470-bed hospital and a full range of outpatient services.

Although music therapy has been a service at MSK since the 1970’s, the current music therapy program of the Integrative Medicine Service (IMS) was established in 2000 and has maintained a continually active presence since that time. The IMS has proven itself an essential part of MSK’s commitment to treating the patient as a whole, offering a wide variety of data-backed, research driven integrative and complementary therapies. IMS is an internationally-known model program accommodating over 20,000 visits from patients and family members each year. Music therapists offer approximately 2400 individual inpatient sessions per year, in addition to group sessions.

Available to all patients of all ages, the music therapy program, addresses physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual needs in order to enhance the quality of life for both patients and families. Specific goals are to help ease fear and anxiety, to enhance creative expression, to help manage symptoms and to promote relaxation and comfort. Music therapists use the elements of music: rhythm, melody, tone, harmony, etc. through song and music making as well as music relaxation and listening. The program uses a variety of instruments, including guitar, keyboard, harp, and percussion.

Other aspects of the music therapy program include:

  • Bedside visits and a unique music and dance group for pediatric patients are held each week in the Claire Tow Pediatric Day Hospital. The group draws upon each participant’s personal creativity and expressivity to promote physical health and ease psychological fears as children and their families await outpatient appointments. This approach assists young children in adjusting to and coping with their diagnoses.
  • Group sessions for adult patients and their visitors are offered weekly in cooperation with the Adult Recreation program. Here, patients and family members have an opportunity to join a drum circle, sing-along or participate in musical meditation sessions. Supportive patient-to-patient communication via musical expression and verbal means is a natural component of these groups.
  • Environmental music therapy is provided in various areas within the hospital, such as the Post Anesthesia Care Unit as well as the Pre-Surgical Unit, as a powerful way to influence the hospital environment as patients cope with stressors surrounding surgery and recovery.
  • Sessions are held for patients who are in isolation for extended periods of time, such as those in the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit. Isolated patients report that music therapy helps to reduce the tension, pain, and feelings of sadness that can accompany isolation before a serious procedure. 
  • Comfort care is provided for patients at the end of life and their families. Comments and letters from staff and family members attest to the effectiveness of this intervention at a time when it can be most difficult to attain a sense of peace and calm.

CURRENT STATUS:
In addition to clinical services, music therapists train and supervise students from affiliated
graduate programs providing valuable clinical fieldwork and internship opportunities. Clinical observers from medical schools and an international network of hospitals spend time learning from therapists. Music therapists provide in-services to staff and take a leadership role in offering staff bereavement sessions.

The Music Therapy Program is supported by MSKCC through an endowment for Integrative Medicine from the Laurence S. Rockefeller Foundation. Importantly, the Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation for Cancer Research provides significant external philanthropic support.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
As part of the Department of Medicine’s service-specific evaluations, the Integrative Medicine Service (home of the Music Therapy Program) presents its progress in clinical, research, and educational efforts to the entire leadership group on a regular basis.

The IMS’s research indicating that music therapy significantly enhances mood among patients awaiting bone marrow transplantation was published in the journal Cancer in 2003.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/1979.cfm
http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/94297.cfm - Music as An Integrative Approach to Healing

Publications:
Cassileth, B.R., Vickers, A.J. & Magill, L.A. (2003) Music therapy for mood disturbance during hospitalization for autologous stem cell transplantation: a randomized controlled trial. Cancer.  98(12): 2723-9.

Magill, L. (2001) The use of music therapy to address the suffering in advanced cancer pain. Journal of Palliative Care. 17(3), 167-72.

Magill, L. (2006) Role of music therapy in integrative oncology. Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology. 4(2), 79-81.

Popkin, K., Levin, T., Lichtenthal, W., Redl, N., Rothstein, H., Siegel, D., Coyle, N. (2011) A pilot music therapy-centered grief intervention for nurses and ancillary staff working in cancer setting. Music and Medicine, 3 (1), 40-46.

In the Press:
Newman, A., Ringer, C., Spense, S. (2010) Reclaim Your Life. Your Health Monthly, October, 2-           3.
Bond, V. (2009) Health: Portrait of an Artist. Welltone New Music Newsletter, 3, December.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Address: Music Therapy Program, Integrative Medicine Service, 1429 First Avenue,
            New York, NY 10021
Phone: (212) 639-6119
Contact Person: Karen Popkin, LCAT, MT-BC
Email: popkink@mskcc.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health 
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America
PROJECT:

MUSIC THERAPY SERVICES FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: THE NORDOFF-ROBBINS CENTER FOR MUSIC THERAPY AT NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

DESCRIPTION:
Founded in 1989, the Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy is a part of New York University’s graduate music therapy program. Children and adults with special needs come to the Center for individual and small group music therapy sessions. 

Through the program, clients at all levels of need are brought into active musical participation in small treatment groups and individual sessions. The music and activities, carefully crafted by their therapists, provide a positive and inviting environment in which they may develop their abilities and potential to live a satisfying life. Musical experiences, facilitated by music therapy professionals, provide support and motivation to relate, use and develop intact abilities, and experience the joys of a creative community.

The Center cooperates with outside schools and agencies, providing music therapy services to the New York City Department of Education programs for children in special education, with hearing impairments; teens in a transition program designed to help former special education students make a successful transition to the workplace. Through the Association for the Help of Retarded Children (AHRC), the Center also works with individuals who have developmental disabilities.

The Center offers a variety of outreach and collaborative programs, both on site and in the community. Staff music therapists have provided music therapy services to individuals with HIV/AIDS in collaboration with the Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC) and to the elderly with dementia at the Chelsea Adult Day Health Center.

The Center is privately funded by the Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Foundation and other donations.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy is a treatment, training and research center that offers:

  • Clinical services on-site to clients from early intervention to adults
  • Training for graduate students and professional music therapists
  • On-going research to determine the effects of music therapy on children with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities
  • Dissemination of information to the general public, parents, educators, and other professionals
  • Professional writing, presentations and conferences

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/music/nordoff
http://www.nordoff-robbinsfoundation.org/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CuAjiU7RBg&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nw7DbmhhLoY

Publications:
Aigen, K. (1997). Here we are in music: One year with an adolescent, creative music therapy group. St. Louis, MO: MMB Music.

Aigen, K. (1998). Paths of Development in Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers.

Nordoff, P. & Robbins, C. (2007). Creative Music Therapy: A Guide to Fostering Clinical Musicianship. Gilsum, NH. Barcelona Publishers.

Turry, A. (2009). Integrating Musical and Psychological Thinking: The Relationship Between Music and Words in Clinically Improvised Songs. In Music and Medicine 1(2) Sage Publications.

Turry, A & Marcus, D. (2003). Using the Nordoff-Robbins approach to music therapy with adults diagnosed with autism. In D. Weiner and L. Oxford (Ed.s) Action Therapy with Families and Groups: Using Creative Arts Improvisation in Clinical Practice. Washington D.C.:  APA.

Turry, A. & Ritholz, M. (1994). The journey by train: Creative music therapy with a 17 year old boy. Music Therapy, 12(2). Barcelona Publishers.

CONTACT INFORMATION:             
Organization: The Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy
Address: New York University, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development,
            82 Washington Square East, 4th floor, New York, NY 10003
Phone: 212-998-5151
Contact Persons: Dr. Alan Turry, Managing Director, Professor Barbara Hesser, Faculty Director
Email: nordoff.robbins@nyu.edu


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America
PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY SERVICES FOR MENTALLY ILL ADULTS: THE BALTIC STREET MUSIC THERAPY PROGRAM AT SOUTH BEACH PSYCHIATRIC CENTER

DESCRIPTION:
As a satellite community-based facility of South Beach Psychiatric Center, The Baltic Street Clinic serves seriously and chronically mentally ill adults in Brooklyn, New York. Starting with its music therapy program established in 1975, it has gained a reputation as the arts therapy center of Brooklyn due to its innovative programs in music, art, dance, drama, and poetry therapy.

Outstanding features of its music therapy program have included:

  • The Baltic Street Band – founded in 1991, this performing group has received numerous awards for the empowerment it has provided to the nearly sixty mentally ill musicians for whom music therapy services have been provided.
  • The Baltic Street Recording and Technology Studio, originally opened in 2001 through a grant from the Mehta Family Foundation, has recently been renovated and updated by a grant from the Tyson Foundation for Music Therapy. 
  • The “After Hours Club” is a monthly cabaret instituted in 1993 that serves as a monthly gathering for community musicians and artists. The Club features the music of the Baltic Street Band. It has hosted an international assembly of bands and artists in the mental health world from Denmark, Holland, China, Norway and Japan.
  • Music and Cultures – a core music therapy group that celebrates the richness of cultural musical heritage thereby promoting inter-cultural exchanges.
  • Music Therapy Songwriting – many original songwriters have been encouraged to develop their skills through this group. Their work is then produced in the Recording Studio and played in live performances in the After Hours Club.
  • Music Improvisation Group – improvisation lies at the core of the music therapy approach at Baltic Street with individuals who are interested in music as therapy.
  • Individual Music Therapy –offers a means of connection in an intensive and personalized approach.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Baltic Street Music Recording Technology Training Program promotes technical proficiency in the operation of recording hardware and software for musicians with serious mental health problems. This program supports improvement in quality of life as well as readiness to employ technical skills in outside settings. The Baltic Street program is currently training its third class of students. Placements for graduates in music business settings are ongoing. Additionally, two student graduates will assist in the training of the incoming third generation class.  Baltic Street continues to offer music therapy services in performance and other community music therapy approaches. The program is supported by the Tyson Fund for Music Therapy.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
A Quality of Life research scale was used in conjunction with participant interviews in evaluating the impact that the Digital Recording Training Program had on research participants. The data from this mixed quantitative and qualitative methodology is currently being analyzed. Plans for expanding this pilot study into a larger scaled research effort are under consideration.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.proyectovision.net/english/success/ayala.html
http://www.cat-bmhc.org/festivals.html
http://www.nycvoices.org/article_642.php
http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/26/22/26_22circusundays.html

Selected Publications:
https://normt.uib.no/index.php/voices/article/view/275

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Baltic Street Clinic, South Beach Psychiatric Center
Address: 250 Baltic Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Phone: (718) 855-3131; Fax: (718) 855-4011
Contact Person: Peter Jampel, D.A., MT-BC, LCAT, Director
E-Mail: peter.jampel@nyu.edu


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY: 
United States of America

PROJECT: 
PROVIDING COMMUNITY-BASED MUSIC AND CREATIVE ARTS THERAPY SERVICES FOR SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN AND ADULTS: ARTS FOR HEALING

DESCRIPTION:
Founded in 2000, Arts For Healing is a unique, nurturing community-based center that enables individuals with learning and developmental disabilities to improve the quality of their lives through music and creative arts therapy. A not-for-profit organization in New Canaan, Connecticut, Arts For Healing, serves special needs children, adolescents and adults, and their families, in Fairfield and Westchester Counties. Using interactive and enriching artistic experiences, Arts For Healing seeks to enhance clients’ communication skills, attention span, fine and gross motor skills, social skills, and language development.

Arts For Healing aims to break through barriers that isolate clients and create a channel for self-expression. To achieve this mission, therapists in the center utilize a systematic Integrated Music and Arts Therapy (IMAT) approach, developed by the Founder, in which modalities such as music, art, drama and poetry are used interchangeably or separately, depending on the needs of the clients. In music therapy sessions, clinical improvisation is used as a vehicle for songwriting, learning an instrument, letter and number recognition, working out conflicts through musical expression and storytelling through words and pictures. The inherent power of music within the creative process becomes both the symbol of expression and the means for growth.    

Arts For Healing also promotes clients’ identity development. The continuous act of creating something new through music and the creative arts enables individuals at any age to constantly re-examine themselves and the reality they inhabit at that particular time. This new self-concept and understanding is the key to a positive relationship between the student’s internal and external worlds. As students progress, their renewed awareness and self-confidence is carried with them into their family relationships, school settings, and community.

Arts For Healing Program Features:

  • Music, art and expressive therapy for individuals and groups
  • TheaterWorks on Grove – weekly workshops that foster socialization and self- expression through interactive musical and dramatic play experiences in small group settings
  • Custom designed music instruction for individuals and groups, particularly students on the autism spectrum and with severe learning disabilities
  • Socialization playgroups – group sessions that promote socialization and play for young children with developmental disabilities and those on the autism spectrum
  • Community outreach including Elementary, Middle and High School programs, services for Child Guidance Centers, Pre-K developmental nursery schools, parent programs, parent-child programs, an ongoing music therapy program at elderly care centers, and a new program at a local pediatric hospital

CURRENT STATUS:
Arts For Healing is funded through a combination of grants, foundations, individual donors, corporate sponsors and client revenue.
RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Arts For Healing utilizes informal evaluation procedures to assess its programs, including integrated feedback from parents, teachers and staff.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.artsforhealing.org

Publications:
Nisenson, K. (2008). The importance of integrated music and art in therapy and special education. Exceptional Parent Magazine, 38(3), 42-44.

Nisenson, K. (2011). Developing self expression and targeting sensory motor issues through adaptive piano instruction. The Motor Story.  Retrieved from http://www.themotorstory.com/The_Motor_Story/Karen_Nisenson.html

Leontiou, J.F. (2010).  Living with CP: Why do we have to be anything but beautiful?  Cerebral Palsy Magazine, volume (issue number)Retrieved from www.cerebralpalsymagazine.com

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization:  Arts For Healing
Address: 24 Grove St., New Canaan, CT  06840
Phone: 203-972-2982
Contact Person:  Karen Nisenson, MT-BC, Founder/Clinical Director
Email:  knisenson@artsforhealing.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America
PROJECT:

PROVIDING SONGS FOR CHILDREN FACING LIFE THREATENING ILLNESS AND LIFETIME DISABILITY: SONGS OF LOVE FOUNDATION

DESCRIPTION:
The Songs of Love Foundation’s (SOL) was founded in 1996. It’s mission is to bring joy and alleviate suffering by providing uplifting, personalized songs on CDs for children in the United States and worldwide who are coping with life-threatening illness and lifetime disability. In addition to songs sent to recipients in the USA, SOL has sent songs to Ireland, England, South Korea, Japan, Scotland, Israel, Cuba and Brazil.

Volunteer “Music Messengers” across the country seek out children in need in their communities. The process begins when a family fills out a Song Request Form that is made available from the SOL office and web site, hospitals, clinics and community organizations. The Music Coordinator assigns a request to an artist who writes and produces a song based on the information provided. The songwriter makes a master recording that is checked by the Music Coordinator for content, originality and quality and then burned onto a CD. Songs are created in 30 languages and any musical style requested, usually within 4 weeks.    

The organization has worked with over 350 professional singer/songwriters who compose and record “songs of love.” Since the inception of SOL over 22,000 songs have been  recorded for children. Songwriters are identified through referrals and ads placed in music publications and on websites. Each songwriter is auditioned and pre-selected for quality, versatility, originality and reliability. Some of the artists are known for their hit songs. Songwriter bios and sample songs are included on the SOL web site.

CURRENT STATUS:
Project 1: Songs of Love for Children Who Are Ill
Songs of Love Foundation provides songs free of charge to terminally and chronically ill children from birth to 21 years of age. Children served are from all ethnicities and socio economic backgrounds.  Recipients of a “song of love” report that the songs enhance self-esteem, encourage smiles and laughter, promote wellness, manage stress, alleviate pain, enhance memory, improve communication and support physical rehabilitation. The song impacts the entire family, healthcare staff and friends, as well as the recipient. Due to the portability of the CD, a child is able to bring their “song of love” with them wherever they may be, so they can draw on its therapeutic value at any time.

Project 2: Raising Funds Raising Voices
The SOL “Raising Funds Raising Voices” engages the community by working with volunteer groups in schools, corporations and other organizations by arranging for these groups to lend their voices and record a “song of love” for a sick child in their community as well as raise funds. SOL will come to a group of any size and turn ordinary people into recording artists. This special program is a team building activity that will boost morale and ensure that everyone leaves feeling they have made a difference. SOL brings all necessary equipment – a simple and quick setup consisting of a laptop computer, two speakers and microphones. The organization provides the location, an electrical outlet and the crowd.  A free download of the finished song is available on the SOL web site within hours of finishing each project. SOL has worked with groups of ten and up, including crowds of thousands, in this innovative program.

 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.songsoflove.org
www.songsoflove.org/60minutes
www.songsoflove.org/teambuilding
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6ALfljuqEw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRUZbS_EH0g

Publications:
The New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/01/nyregion/nyc-yes-it-s-a-hit-a-sick-child-is-smiling.html
http://www.nytimes.com/1996/10/12/nyregion/songs-in-the-key-of-life.html
USA Today:
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-05-14-songs-of-love_N.htm
American Profile:
http://www.americanprofile.com/heroes/article/18983.html

Contact Information:
Organization: Songs of Love Foundation
Contact Person: John Beltzer, Founder and Director
Email : john@songsoflove.org 


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
Music for Lifelong Learning
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
TRANSFORMING LIVES AND COMMUNITIES THROUGH MUSIC: THE CENTER FOR MUSIC NATIONAL SERVICE

 Please Refer to SECTION I, PAGE 35



SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United States of America

PROJECT:
USING MUSIC TO ADDRESS COGNITIVE, PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL NEEDS OF PERSONS WITH NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS: THE INSTITUTE FOR MUSIC AND NEUROLOGIC FUNCTION

DESCRIPTION:
The Institute for Music and Neurologic Function(IMNF), a nonprofit agency, was founded in 1995 on the idea that music has unique powers to heal, rehabilitate, and inspire.  The Institute is a member of the Beth Abraham Family of Health Services in New York City. It is dedicated to advancing scientific inquiry on music and the brain and to developing innovative music-based clinical treatments that benefit people of all ages with neurologic disorders, such as stroke, trauma, Alzheimer’s Disease, other forms of dementia, Parkinson’s Disease, as well as other diseases and conditions. The music therapy program is provided by credentialed music therapists and features the following components:

  • Music to enhance memory function. Music of personal importance can stimulate a patient’s past memories, images and personal experiences. Musical patterns are paired with new information to aid in short-term memory, increased attention span and improved quality of life.
  • Integrated music therapy and rehabilitation program. Through careful assessment, music (rhythm, melody and song) is used to help patients improve walking, balance, range of motion and communication skills.
  • Therapeutic drumming program.By engaging in rhythm-based activities and active drum playing, patients can optimize physical, cognitive and psycho/social well-being.
  • Digital music technology program for rehabilitation. Adaptive digital music technologies are incorporated into interactive music therapy sessions to increase rehabilitative goals.
  • The Music has Power Recording Studio. The studio is dedicated to the improvement of people's physical, emotional and neurological function by engaging the patient in creative expression, decision making. 
  • Medical music psychotherapy. Process-oriented treatment is given to enhance self-expression and provide emotional support. Patients develop trust and a relationship with the therapist, allowing access to deep feelings and emotions through music.
  • Pain reduction through music program. Music therapy can help reduce the amount of pain a patient perceives: can promote relaxation, rest, rhythmic breathing and alleviate anxiety and depression.
  • Well-Tuned: Music Players for Health Program. Using an MP3 player/iPod, individuals can benefit from therapeutic music programs throughout their day. The program is integrated into the patients’ care plan and includes personally selected music.
  • Community music therapy programs.Therapeutic music activities are provided in large community spaces with goals to improve overall wellness, as well as enhance interpersonal relationships and connection to others.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Institute for Music and Neurologic Function is a treatment, training and research center which offers:

  • Music therapy clinical services on-site, at out-patient clinics and in-home services to clients of all ages. Clinical service hours average 200 hours per week
  • Collaborations with neuroscientists to advance knowledge on how music affects brain function
  • Training for graduate students and professional music therapists
  • Program development at other institutions
  • Dissemination of information to the general public, and other professionals
  • Professional writing, presentations and conferences

The IMNF is funded by the Beth Abraham Family of Health Services, music therapy contracts with healthcare agencies and through grants and philanthropic support.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
IMNF is actively engaged in research to document clinical outcomes.  The national importance of the Institute’s clinical research was recognized by the United States Administration on Aging, which provided a grant to support the Institute's work on innovative music-based approaches to stroke and dementia care. The treatment approaches developed by the Institute have been recognized as best practices in the field and serve as models for many other health care providers.

The IMNF has engaged such outside research agencies as the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) to provide data analysis on large scale music therapy studies using a variety of standardized measures. Clinical effectiveness is measured utilizing standardized tools which objectively rate changes in physical, cognitive, communication and psychosocial well-being. Such tools include:  Mini-mental status exam (MMSE), Functional Independence Measures (FIM), Boston Aphasia Battery and Quality of Life.

Recently funded studies include:

  • The Effect of Active Music Making on Depression and Apathy in Community-Based Day Health

Care Patients with Neurological Impairments: A Non-randomized controlled clinical trial

  • Enhancing Community-based and Home Care with Music Therapy

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.imnf.org

Publications:
Tomaino ,C.M. (2011). Using Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation for Rehabilitation. In J. Berger, G. Turow (eds) Music, Science, and the Brain: Cultural and Clinical Implications. New York: Routledge, pp 111-121.

Tomaino, C.M. (2009). Clinical Application of Music therapy in Neurological Rehabilitation. In R. Haas, V. Brandes (eds) Music that Works. Austria: SpringerWienNewYork pp 211-220.

M. Kim and C. Tomaino (2008). Protocol Evaluation for Effective Music Therapy for Persons with Aphasia. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 15 (6), pp. 555-569.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, A Member of the Beth Abraham Family of Health Services
Address: 612 Allerton Ave, Bronx, New York USA
Contact Person: Concetta M. Tomaino, DA, MT-BC, LCAT, Executive Director/Co-Founder
Email: ctomaino@bethabe.org


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
China

PROJECT:
USING MUSIC TO CHANNEL AND REGULATE EMOTIONS: THE BEIJING SCHOOL PROJECT FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED

DESCRIPTION:
Started in early 2011, this school-based program works with small groups of visually impaired children through music. Its goals are to improve appropriate social behavior, emotional self-regulation and ultimately improve school performance. Children are engaged through a combination of singing and instrument playing to channel impulses and learn how to work cooperatively with other children. Emotions are channeled through the use of instruments chosen by the students to help them express intense and chaotic feelings. Through learning how to play instruments harmoniously together social bonds are created. The teacher provides strong rhythmic and harmonic support to the students on the piano and through verbal interventions. So far, approximately twenty children have received services.

CURRENT STATUS:
The project is currently ongoing and might be expanded in the near future. It is currently being funded by the Beijing Education Bureau, and the Chinese Music Therapy Association.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.cmta.com.cn

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Some sessions are video recorded and all sessions notated in an ongoing journal kept by the therapist heading the program. These materials are then studied for behavioral changes in the children and provide a means by which intervention strategies are evaluated.

At this early stage of implementation, improvement has already been noted by the music teacher in charge in terms of reduced levels of aggression and agitation as well as strengthening self-esteem and communication skills with others.

CONTACT INFORMATION:                                            
Organization: Chinese Music Therapy Association
Address: Beijing Huilongguan Hospital
Phone: 86-10-62715511, Ext: 6364; Fax:  86-10-62716285
Contact Person: Xiao Xun
E-mail: xxun123@163.com


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
Music for Working with Trauma Survivors
clefCOUNTRY:
India

PROJECT:
THE COMMUNITY MUSIC THERAPY PROGRAM: THE MUSIC THERAPY TRUST

DESCRIPTION:
The Music Therapy Trust (TMTT) became a recognized charity in India in 2005. It was founded in order to bring clinical music therapy to India as a way to support the well-being of people living in impoverished and marginalized settings with multiple psychosocial, physical and medical needs. TMTT has initiated many projects throughout India, such as “The Community Music Therapy Program.” TMTT has also introduced the “The Music Therapy Academy” which offers the first professional clinical music therapy training program in India as well as the first clinical music therapy network as a way to further extend services nationwide.  

Mental health and social issues in India exist on a huge scale. The WHO estimates that approximately 10% of the underage population of India is physically or mentally disabled. At least 4 million children are diagnosed as being on the Autism Spectrum. Likewise, according to UNICEF 2010, 42% of the population lies below the international poverty line. Millions of children, young people and adults are marginalized and vulnerable, with little or no prospects, while families suffer financial hardship, malnutrition and illnesses. The numbers of health professionals are limited and few resources exist to address these many issues. The poor and disadvantaged are the least able to access the limited treatment available.

“The Community Music Therapy Program” is situated in Delhi and works in partnership with several organizations in the community-at-large. It provides music therapy services to numerous children, teens and adults with a variety of issues, including those with autism, cerebral palsy and/or physical disabilities. In addition, the program works with orphans, street children, those with HIV and life threatening illnesses and survivors of trauma. The program includes ongoing workshops, to support the parents and families and to educate them about ways to effectively incorporate music in their lives. The five community music therapy projects currently underway are:

  • “Music Club” is a unique music club run by a TMTT music therapist for children and teens with physical and/or emotional challenges. These children, who have been rejected or excluded by family or society, work together with a music therapist using rhythms, songs and instruments. The project aims to enhance self esteem, to offer support and to help the children through music to express their pain, anger and neglect so they can return to mainstream education.
  • “Music Therapy with the Disadvantaged” TMTT is working in collaboration with Bal Sahyog, a Delhi-based Children’s Home for children in need of care and protection, which provides residential and educational facilities to about 100 children from disadvantaged families. With TMTT music therapists, the children and teens engage in music making and song writing to help enhance self esteem, sense of pleasure and improve their social and leadership skills.
  • “Music Therapy with Autism” TMTT works closely with autistic children and their families through an ongoing collaboration with Action For Autism (AFA). At the TMTT Music Centre situated at AFA, many children receive individual/group music therapy sessions and parents attend workshops to explore the use of music at home. Likewise, TMTT partners with Anchal Charitable Trust to offer music therapy sessions to 24 children and teens with autism, cerebral palsy, learning difficulties or physical disabilities in the slums of East Delhi and Ghaziabad.
  • “Music Therapy with Children with HIV” India is home to the world’s largest population of HIV orphans and these children face staggering risks and typically die young or live on the streets. TMTT provides music therapy services to children at the NAZ AIDS Foundation, a foster home for children who are HIV positive, many of whom have been abandoned and are traumatized. The children are engaged in interactive music making in sessions and build nurturing and affirming relationships through sessions with the music therapists and with others at the home.
  • “Music Therapy Drum Circles with Mainstreamed School Children” TMTT conducts ongoing drum circles with children receiving main stream education. Groups of children engage with TTMT music therapists in drum circles that are directed towards helping the children develop social and leadership skills through exploring rhythms, vocal and natural sounds. Sessions take place at “Teen Murti Bhavan,” Delhi.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Music Therapy Trust is self-funding, supported through gifts, donations and through fund raising efforts.

In addition to this ongoing program, The Music Therapy Trust has recently established a collaboration with Handicap International India and ADAPT to conduct a program: “Music for Children with Special Needs- Gujarat and Mumbai.” This program provides music therapy to children with special needs and conducts ongoing classes with health professionals and educators to help them understand ways to incorporate music as a therapeutic tool with children. This program serves children through these six groups: The Blind Welfare Council, Dahod; The Mangal Murti Trust Vikalang Trust, Junagadh; “Navashkti Vidyalay for Developmentally Challenged Children” Rajkot, Gujarat; The “Shree Mahadev Educational and Rehabilitation Public Charitable Trust” Surat, Gujarat; and with Special Educators in Mumbai. These projects are helping extend the provision of music services to thousands of children and families throughout India.
  
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.themusictherapytrust.com

http://www.sunday-guardian.com/young-restless/music-therapy-acts-as-a-reprieve-for-the-ailing
http://www.aalatimes.com/2011/06/22/the-sound-of-music-a-healing-therapy/ http://www.hindustantimes.com/tabloid-news/mumbai/Brett-Lee-to-assist-slum- children-to-keep-pace-with-musical-notes/Article1-698898.aspx
 
CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Music Therapy Trust                      
Address: c/o Action For Autism, Jasola Vihar, Pocket 7 & 8, New Delhi 110025
Phone: 98 9998 1864
Contact Persons: Dr. Margaret Lobo, FRSA, Founder and Chief Advisor; Mr. Navin Nayan, Program Manager; Dr. Lucanne Magill, Course Tutor, International Internship Coordinator, Music Therapist; Mr. Somesh Purey, Music Therapist
E-mail: themusictherapytrust@gmail.com; musictherapy.tmtt@gmail.com


SECTIONS:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
Music for Sustainable Community Development
clefCOUNTRY:
Nepal

PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY FOR AUTISTIC CHILDREN:  THE MUSIC THERAPY TRUST NEPAL

DESCRIPTION:
In 2005, The Music Therapy Trust (TMTT) became a recognized charity in India. It was founded to bring clinical music therapy to India as a way to support the well-being of people living in impoverished and marginalized settings who have multiple challenges and psychosocial, physical and medical needs. TMTT introduced the first professional clinical music therapy, training program in India, as well as the first clinical music therapy network as a way to further extend clinical services nationwide. In 2010, TMTT expanded to form TMTTN which represents the Trust’s ongoing partnership with neighboring country Nepal. TMTTN works in collaboration with Autism Care Nepal (ACN) who estimate that there are between 10,000 to 50,000 people on the autistic spectrum in Nepal. They have founded a school that provides specialized behavioral and educational programs for children with autism.

The “Music Therapy Nepal” program is located in Kathmandu. There, at ACN, a Music Therapy Centre was created and children receive ongoing individualized music therapy services. Also, ongoing workshops are being held with educators and with parents to enable children to benefit in a most effective way. “Music Therapy Nepal” has these primary goals:

  1. To support children with special needs through clinical music therapy services
  2. To improve the functioning of these children through music-based services that are directed towards enhancing communication, emotional, academic and social skills
  3. Through ongoing workshops, inform special educators, parents and families about music therapy with special needs children and to inspire them to incorporate music, thereby enhancing their overall well-being

To reach these goals, the music therapists hold individual and group sessions with children and families. Improvisational and structured activities incorporating various Nepalese and traditional percussive and melodic instruments and songs are used in ongoing sessions. Informational and interactive sessions are also held with parents to enhance the ongoing use of music in the home and by educators to improve therapeutic incorporation of music in classrooms. 
 
CURRENT STATUS:
To date, approximately 300 children have benefited from this program in Nepal. In addition, forty parents and fifty educators have participated in workshops. There is one full-time clinical music therapist. In addition, four volunteer music students and two music therapy interns have come from Europe for two-week to three-month periods of time. In addition, two volunteer clinical music therapists from the UK come for a short visit.

The Music Therapy Trust Nepal is beginning to expand its services to other areas of need. Groups of street children are now receiving music therapy. In addition, TMTTN has recently established a partnership with Himalayan Care Hands Nepal and The Himalayan Leaders through which it is presenting workshops for deaf people and also for tourists trekking in Nepal. Music therapy workshops are also being organized for the Gandharba community, the traditional Nepalese musicians who are marginalized and need psychosocial support.

The Music Therapy Trust Nepal is self-funded, supported through gifts, donations and through fund raising efforts. ACN, an NGO in Nepal, provides some financial support in order for music therapy to be offered to the autistic children receiving their services. This project is ongoing and the partnership with the community is strong. Further resources are being sought to further extend care and music therapy services into other areas in Nepal affected by poverty, health and social issues.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.themusictherapytrust.com
www.autismnepal.org

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Music Therapy Trust India/Nepal
Address: c/o Action For Autism, Jasola Vihar, Pocket 7 & 8, New Delhi, India 110025
Phone: 98999 81864
Contact Persons            : Dr. Margaret Lobo, Director, TMTT
                          Dr. Lucanne Magill, Course Tutor, International Internship Coordinator
E-mail: themusictherapytrust@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Japan

PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY TO PROMOTE EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: MOYO

DESCRIPTION:
MOYO is a music therapy center for children with disabilities in Matsudo-City, in the Chiba Prefecture. All children under the age of eighteen who are currently living in Japan qualify for services. The primary purpose of this initiative is to serve the varied needs of both clients and their parents. The clients’ areas of disability range from autism and Aspergers Syndrome, to PDD, ADHD, developmental delays, Down Syndrome, CP, and various other physical disabilities. Currently 32 children are served. The treatment is a creative music therapy approach using improvised music to help promote emotional and physical development in the clients. In addition to clinical services, the center supervises music therapy trainees, provides lecturers to university students and produces community performances.

MOYA provides child disability support services that operate under the umbrella of a social welfare corporation, Matsudo Ikuseikai, Matsubokkuri. In April 2010, MOYO launched a day-care service enterprise for children under the provisions of the Services and Support for Persons with Disabilities Act of 2005 that provides compensation for music therapy services. This enabled clients to receive music therapy at one-tenth of the cost.

CURRENT STATUS:
The government and the prefectural and city council cover ninety percent of the session fees. The clients cover the remaining one-tenth of the cost. New populations, such as victims of child abuse, will be eligible for music therapy services beginning in April, 2012 under enacted legislative reforms to the Child Welfare Act. It is expected that the demand for music therapy at MOYO will correspondingly increase.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Each session is filmed as visual documentation. By so doing, sessions are reviewed for analysis, study and evaluation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:                            
http://www.pinecone.or.jp/public/index.html (Japanese only)

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Music Therapy Center, MOYO
Address: 1-64 Matsubokkuri Mutsumi Matsudo-city Chiba Japan 270-2204 
Phone: 81-80-1317-5769    
Contact Persons: Yuki Masuyama, Director; E-mail: masuyama@pinecone.or.jp
Mayuko Watanabe, Music Therapist; Email: music7child@yahoo.co.jp


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Pakistan

PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY CENTRE FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

DESCRIPTION:
The Music Therapy Centre’s (MTC) services are goal oriented and client-centered with the aim of building a therapeutic relationship through music between client and therapist. At the MTC, goals are set with participants of all ages and with various special needs. Typical goals include improved mood, deepened personal insight, healed emotional wounds, increased self-esteem, and greater clarity in one's sense of life, and spiritual development. Improvisation, musical games, singing, music listening, song writing and music and imagery are all employed with clients. Simple music and imagery techniques are also used to work through various barriers to greater inner wholeness. MTC offers a special program on Autism and Dyslexia. Workshops are given for parents and teachers in different special schools, Autism Centre, and Readyslexic (a centre for children with dyslexia). The aims of the workshops are to provide awareness about Music Therapy and how Music Therapy reduces the symptoms of Autism and Dyslexia.

CURRENT STATUS:
MTC is a private centre in the area of Karachi. MTC is serving children and adults with disabilities and disseminating information about music therapy to special educators, doctors, psychologists, parents, and the general public.

MTC is currently looking for sponsors and funds to establish the centre in a private facility along with other therapies. MTC is seeking help from international music therapy institutions and associations to design a short course in Music Therapy for Musicians and Special Educators in Pakistan. Future research projects are currently in the planning stage and are seeking funding sources.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Ongoing case evaluation procedures are in place. Individual client assessments for each case are part of the intake process.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
The Music Therapy Centre website is under development and will be completed shortly.

Publications:
Article by Mr. Sohail Khan: http://epaper.dawn.com/ArticleImageEx.aspx?article=21_06_2009_432_004_001&type=2

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Music Therapy Centre
Address: B-37 Block C North Nazimabad, Karachi 74700, Pakistan
Phone: +92-21-35445048, +92-345-3179727
Contact Person: Sohail Ahmed Khan, Founder and Director
Email: mtc.musictherapy@yahoo.com; sohailk22@yahoo.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/Sohailk22


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY: 
Thailand
PROJECT:

MUSIC THERAPY SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS IN THE BANGKOK AREA

DESCRIPTION:
In Thailand, music is a fundamental need. However, the use of music to address developmental needs across the lifespan is not yet being systematically used in healthcare and educational systems. There is clearly a value and appreciation for music in the environment as there are a number of medical facilities that offer ambient music in the waiting area. However, there are few opportunities for active music making with clients and caregivers.

Created through a partnership between the College of Music, Mahidol University and the University of Kansas, music therapists are now offering music therapy services to individuals in healthcare and educational institutions in Bangkok and the surrounding area. Therapists are trained and supervised by the Music Therapy Department at the University of Kansas and currently serve approximately 110 clients per week, ranging from special needs children to the elderly. Clinical sites include the Sirindhorn Rehabilitation Center, Golden Jubilee Medical Center and the Mahidol University School of Physical Therapy. Music therapy group services are provided on a weekly basis and focus on cognitive and physical rehabilitation goals that align with the services provided by the physical and occupational therapists in each location. A focus on Thai folk and popular music, primarily during group-based outpatient services, provides opportunities for clients, caregivers and staff to engage in active music making instead of only passive listening experiences. Caregivers and other therapists often participate in the sessions in an effort to increase patient-caregiver interactions in addition to providing social opportunities and support by patients undergoing similar treatments.

A 20-hour continuing education course entitled the “Therapeutic Uses of Music” has been offered for the purpose of training allied health professionals and educators on the therapeutic uses of music as it pertains to clients in healthcare and educational settings. In order to educate professionals and the public about the therapeutic effects of music, the College of Music has developed promotional materials and clinical videos in both English and Thai for distribution to community partners as well as materials for patients, including a CD and handout for take home use. In-service presentations are also being offered to illustrate the use of music therapy with a variety of clinical populations. Presentations have been given to the College of Nursing administration team at Mahidol University, at the Alternative Treatments for Autism Conference, the nursing faculty at Siriraj Hospital and nursing faculty and students from Mae Fah Laung and Sao-Hai Hospital.

CURRENT STATUS:
Initial funding for this project was supported by the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars Fulbright Award in 2009. Currently, funding is provided by the Mahidol University College of Music, the Thailand Ministry of Education, Commission of Higher Education and the private sector. Funding by the Thai government has been given for the purpose of researching the effects of music therapy over the next 3 years. A research partners program is being formalized and will pair US and Thai researchers to conduct 4-6 studies per year, for the next 2-3 years.

In June 2012, the College of Music will initiate a Music Therapy degree program in which musicians receive intensive training as well as provide clinical music therapy services to individuals in Bangkok and the surrounding area. The overarching mission of this program will be to serve as the pinnacle in the provision of music therapy services to patients and families, to be a leader in training music therapists, to be a forerunner in conducting music therapy research and to create community partnerships throughout Thailand.  

Moving towards this initiative, a Community Partners program will commence in October 2011 that includes a signed agreement between the College of Music and its current and future clinical sites. This agreement will formalize this partnership, provide staff training and weekly music therapy services at each location and create a foundation of practicum sites to be offered within the Music Therapy degree program. Future sites include the Siriraj Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Siriraj Hospital Outpatient Rehabilitation, and Pak Kred Orphanage. 

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Current research projects in development include:

  • Implementing Music Therapy Clinical Services & Training in Thailand: Interviews with patients, caregivers and medical professionals.
  • Perceptions of Music Therapy in the Medical Setting in Thailand: A survey of training participants.
  • The Effects of Music Therapy on Quality of Life, Minimum Mental State & Depression in Outpatient Rehabilitation Patients in Thailand.
  • An Evaluation of Implementing Music Therapy for Pediatric Patients in Outpatient, Early Intervention Clinics: Co-treatment with physical & occupational therapy.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfoi-15Pvew
http://www.music.mahidol.ac.th/

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: University of Kansas
Address:  Murphy Hall, 448-B, 1530 Naismith Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045
Phone:  785-864-9634
Contact Person: Dena Register, Associate Professor of Music Therapy
Email:  register@ku.edu or mahidolmusictherapy@hotmail.com

Organization:  Mahidol University, College of Music
Address:  25/25 Phutthamonthon Sai 4 Road, Salaya, Phutthamonthon Nakhonpathom
             73170, Thailand
Phone:  662-800-2525
Contact Persons:  Dr. Somchai Trankarnrung, Assistant Director of Academic Affairs;
Email:  tsomchai@gmail.com
Vacharavalee  Kaewpaksa, Music Therapy Program Officer; Email: destiny_meandyou@hotmail.com



SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Greece
PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY CENTER OF THESSALONIKI

DESCRIPTION:
The Music Therapy Center of Thessaloniki, Greece was founded in 1992. Since its inception it has been offering music therapy to children and adults with disabilities (mental, physical, learning, etc.), psychotic clients, and individuals and families who suffer from anxiety, trauma, loss and serious illness. Improvisational music as well as music and imagery models are used. Psychological approaches include humanistic and psychoanalytic models.

Since 1994, the center has developed a community music therapy program that enables participants (children and adults with disabilities) to perform in live events, either in a separate venue or as part of generic venues. All of the participants discovered and developed their artistic skills (music playing, poetry, dancing) through individual music therapy sessions prior to their community music therapy activities. Positive changes have occurred in the lives of the performers and their families and the program has furthered the clients’ inclusion in their social environments.  

Since 1996, the Music Therapy Center of Thessaloniki has been running a master’s level training program in music therapy in collaboration with educational institutions in Greece and abroad. Music therapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychoanalysts, art therapists and professionals of related fields from Greece and abroad have been training music therapists from all over Greece. The program has been held in collaboration with the Music College of Thessaloniki and many of the students are now working professionals in music therapy in Greece and abroad.

The center also offers supervision services to music therapists and therapists from other fields since 1997.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Music Therapy Center has also established open collaborations and placements for music therapy work with hospitals, mental institutions, nonprofit organizations and other health related establishments throughout Greece. Certain of these institutions have dedicated resources to support the work of music therapists.

The music therapy center of Thessaloniki has also been organizing seminars, conferences and other events. Representatives of the center have also been attending and presenting in conferences around the world.

The Music Therapy Center of Thessaloniki is supported by private funds and at occasions offers voluntary work to the community.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
The Music Therapy Center of Thessaloniki has collaborated in conducting research with the graduate program of the medical school of the University of Thessaloniki. Currently there is ongoing research with the adolescent unit of the psychiatric clinic of AHEPA university hospital in Thessaloniki that involves understanding the impact that creative expression in music has on mental health. There is also ongoing research on the benefits of community music therapy for children and adults with disabilities. Program evaluation research has focused on the effectiveness of music therapy interventions in Greece.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.musictherapy-center.gr

Publications:
Psaltopoulou, D., and Miheli, M., (2010).  Research: Music Therapy’s contribution for people with disabilities. Second National Psychiatric Conference: Art and Psychiatry. Organizers EPEKEINA, Hania, Crete (Publication in Press).

Psaltopoulou, D. (2005): The music creative expression as a therapeutic means for emotionally disturbed children, Dissertation, AUTH.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Music Therapy Center
Address: Proxenou koromila, 3154622 Thessaloniki, Greece
Phone: +306944767692 and Fax: +302310287818
Contact Person: Dora Psaltopoulou-Kamini, Ph.D, MA-CMT, Lecturer, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Email: dora.ps@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Norway

PROJECT:
ROCK BAND AS EMPOWERMENT FOR SPECIAL NEEDS CLIENTS: RAGNAROCK

DESCRIPTION:
In 1983, the RagnaRock group was started at Nordre Aasen Special School in Oslo, Norway as part of the music therapy program at the school. The clients came mainly from Ragna Ringdals Daycare Centre, a program for developmentally delayed adults. The goals of this project are to promote transformational change in the social status and self-esteem of clients by encouraging them to become rock musicians.

A method called Lettrock was created, with students from the music therapy course at the Norwegian Academy of Music in Oslo, to find ways of playing rock music that the clients could master. Guitars were tuned so they could be played simply with open strings or with one finger pressing just two or three strings. To help clients put their finger on the right fret, colored tapes were put on different frets of the guitar. Colored tapes were also placed on the keyboard. A machine was created with foot switches connected to three colored lamps, parallel to the three most common chords in rock and other ordinary songs. These switches light a lamp whereby we could conduct the harmonies for the band.
 
CURRENT STATUS:
RagnaRock is still active and gives performances regularly. The band now consists of eight pupils from the Oslo Adult Training Centre in Nydalen, Oslo, for developmentally delayed adults. The RagnaRock Band has achieved a high-level of performance ability and has toured in Norway and across Europe. They have appeared on state TV, played in different concert halls and at several music therapy congresses. RagnaRock is supported by the Norwegian government.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aB9ZP9guiU8

Publications:
Naess, T. & Bjørn Steinmo. (1995). Pop and Rock with Colors: Easy ways of building a pop-rock band using special tuning and colors. Norsk Noteservice. 

http://www.notebutikken.no/product_info.asp?Pid=28702
http://www.musictherapytoday.com/WFMT/President_presents..._files/Pop%20and%20rock%20with%20colours1.pdf
http://www.nmh.no/Senter_for_musikk_og_helse/71207 (in Norwegian)

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Project Name: RagnaRock
Address: Norwegian Academy of Music, P.O.Box 5190, Majorstua Slemdalsveien 11NO - 0302, Oslo,      Norway
Phone: + 47 23 36 70 00; Fax: + 47 23 36 70 01
Contact Persons: Professor Tom Naess; E-mail: tom.naess@nmh.no
Heidi Kristoffersen: Oslo Adult Training Centre; Email: heidi.s.kristoffersen@gmail.com


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
United Kingdom

PROJECT:
BRIDGING THE TRANSITION BETWEEN THE PSYCHIATRIC AND THE COMMUNITY: THE CHELSEA COMMUNITY MUSIC THERAPY PROJECT

DESCRIPTION:
The Chelsea Community Music Therapy project in West London is a pioneering Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy practical and research initiative.

The project uses music to help people with mental health difficulties bridge the transition between life in the hospital and their recovery in the community. It takes place between two adjacent facilities: South Kensington and Chelsea Mental Health Centre, a National Health Service psychiatric hospital and SMART, a community centre for people living with mental health issues. The music project, involving two music therapists, helps patients create ‘musical pathways’ between the hospital and the community via SMART - through several interlinked music groups. An open group, “SMART Music” in the café is a cross between a music therapy group and an open-mic group. It runs weekly for anyone who wants to come. Two further spin-off member-only groups - Smart Singers and Smart Band rehearse weekly and perform in local venues, including the lunchtime recital series in the adjacent Chelsea & Westminster Hospital. This Project was featured on BBC Radio 3’s Music Matters Music & Health Special Edition in March 2008 and also won the Royal Society for Public Health ‘Arts & Health Award’ in 2008 – in recognition of ‘significant and innovative contribution made to the field of Music & Health practice’.

CURRENT STATUS:
The project is thriving and progressing, with the research component currently coming to a close. The project will be reported during 2012-13 in a series of publications, in particular a commissioned book from Ashgate Publishers entitled Musical Pathways in Mental Health, authored by Gary Ansdell & Tia DeNora.

Funding is provided through a combination of support from SMART and the Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Centre.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
The research component of the project is under the auspices of Nordoff Robbins Centre’s Research Department in collaboration with Exeter University. The project is a unique five-year longitudinal ethnographic study of the process and outcomes of the project. The research has collected varied qualitative data, including the construction of a series of ‘pathway cases’ that follow people’s ‘recovery paths’ in relation to their ongoing participation in music in various formats.

The project is building a rich theoretical and research perspective on the data through the lenses of cultural sociology and the developing platform of indigenous theory-building from Community Music Therapy.

Overall, the project should provide a framework for mental health services in relation to arts and health activities:

  • Theoretical perspectives for grounding music therapy / music and health work in an appropriate socio-cultural framework that links to current practice, theory and policy in mental health provision
  • Description of exemplary practices that can be used in similar venues
  • Provides ‘evidence of effectiveness’ for the methodologies being used

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.nordoff-robbins.org

Publications:
Ansdell, G. & DeNora, T. (in preparation). Musical Pathways in Mental Health. Farnham: Ashgate Publications.

Stige, Ansdell, Elefant & Pavlicevic (2010). Where Music Helps: Community Music Therapy in Action & Reflection. Adershot: Ashgate Publications.

Ansdell, G. & Meehan, J. (2010) “Some light at the end of the tunnel”: Exploring users’ evidence for the effectiveness of music therapy in adult mental health settings. Music and            Medicine, 2(1), 29-40.

Pavlicevic, M. & Ansdell, G. (2004). Community Music Therapy. London: Jessica Kingsley Publications

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: The Chelsea Community Music Therapy Project
Address: Nordoff Robbins, 2 Lissenden Gardens, London NW5 1PQ UK
Contact Person: Gary Ansdell, PhD
E-mail: gary.ansdell@nordoff-robbins.org.uk


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY: 
United Kingdom
PROJECT:

MUSIC THERAPY FOR PARENTS AND CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: BEING TOGETHER AND PLAYING TOGETHER

DESCRIPTION:
“Being Together and Playing Together” is a pilot project that provides music therapy services to parents and children with special needs in the deprived areas of East London/West Essex. Commissioned by the Epping Forest Children’s Centers, and in partnership with other local government agencies, “Being Together and Playing Together” seeks to create and sustain a community support network to reduce isolation and depression in parents of children with special needs, while also encouraging the use of music making for children with these needs as a form of self-expression and social development. 

“Being Together and Playing Together” is offered as a free, 8-week course for parents and their children, aged one to five. Each 75-minute session includes 30 minutes of musical play between parent/child and a 45-minute verbal parent support group.  Sessions are led collaboratively by a music therapist and family therapist who offer a combination of non-directive clinical improvisation and verbal therapy. Children are encouraged to play freely and at their own ability level. As a result, parents who are overly focused on their child’s limitations begin to perceive their child in new ways. By engaging in the play element of music making with their child, their anxiety also begins to decrease. 

“Being Together and Playing Together” enables parents to explore the meaning and reality of having a child with special needs and enhance their parent/child interaction through the power of music. As a community initiative, parents create a support network that sustains them outside of the group and into the future. 

CURRENT STATUS: 
“Being Together and Playing Together” is the first program of its kind in this part of the United Kingdom.  The project commenced in summer 2010 and will continue via funding from the Epping Forest Children’s Centers, as well as some monetary donations from participants.  The project is currently seeking grant funding from third parties for the 2012-2013 tax year.

“Being Together and Playing Together” is expanding and developing its program with organizations in other deprived areas of London, including two organizations that will offer the project in late 2011.  

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
“Being Together and Playing Together” utilizes qualitative and quantitative research methods to determine its effectiveness and sustainability.  Analysis of participant attendance, a brief questionnaire and informal interviews are used consistently.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Hazelwood Children’s Center
Address: Hill House Primary School Site, Waltham Abbey, Essex, England EN9 3EL
Phone:  011-44-208-522-3216     
Contact Person:  Daniel A. Hyams, Newham Music Therapy Trust
Email: dhyams@lesley.edu


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Israel
PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY FOR ADULTS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

DESCRIPTION:
Ten people from a community hostel, all with intellectual and functional disabilities, participated in a music therapy group that took place at the Bar-Ilan Music Therapy Center during 2010-11. Some clients also suffered from mental illnesses, personality disorders and social and family difficulties. There were 8 men and 2 women ranging in age from 20-60 years old. Transportation for clients was provided each week by the hostel. This is significant since having the program outside the hostel increased clients sense of empowerment. The therapeutic goals were designed according to each individual’s needs in order to strengthen self-confidence and self-image. The goals included:

  • Expanding emotional awareness, improving emotional regulation and encouraging the expression of feelings
  • Developing awareness of each group member’s strengths and difficulties
  • Encouraging active participation in order to strengthen a sense of vitality and creativity
  • Enhancing interactions and communication with peers

At the beginning of the process, the main activity was musical presentations: each member was asked to bring his/her favorite song which was copied onto a CD and song lyrics were printed and distributed to everyone.  The whole group listened to the song and group members shared their feelings and thoughts with the presenters. This activity enabled group members to deal with intimate issues such as interactions with family members, loss and difficult emotions such as anger and sadness. Later musical interventions and activities included improvisation, listening to music, music and imagery and movement to music. All activities were designed and implemented according to the clients’ intellectual abilities.

CURRENT STATUS:
Bar-IlanMusicTherapyCenter is dedicated to enhancing community music therapy. To this end, another music therapy group is planned for next year that will take place in the hostel. 

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
The vision of the Bar-Ilan Music Therapy Center is to enhance theoretical and functional research in the main fields of music therapy (music and medicine, psychology of music, music psychotherapy and music therapy in special education) and to focus on the interaction between research and clinical work.

For this music therapy group, verbal feedback was gathered from all the participants as well as the therapists. Reports indicate that most participants came on a regular basis and felt that the group was important for them. The interactions among group members improved – clients talked about the closeness they felt to other group members and how difficult it was for them to end the group. Some participants were able to relax while listening to the music while others were able to enjoy improvising. Some group members gained insights about themselves. All participants were very involved and opened up emotionally and socially during the process. Both group members and co-leaders expressed deep satisfaction from the process and felt that the work was very meaningful for them.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.biu.ac.il/hu/mu/mt/index.html

Publications:
Amir, D. (2011). My music is me: Musical presentation as a way of forming and sharing identity in music therapy group. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy. DOI: 10.1080/08098131.2011.571279

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Bar-Ilan University
Address: Ramat Gan, 52900 Israel
Contact Persons: Dorit Amir, PhD, Music Therapy Program, Music Department;
Email: dorit.amir@biu.ac.il;
Moshe Bensimon, PhD, Music Therapy Program, Music Department and Criminology Department;
Email: moshe.bensimon@biu.ac.il


Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
Israel
PROJECT: 

SINGING FOR EMPOWERMENT AND BELONGING: A MUSIC THERAPY PROGRAM FOR ELDERS IN A COMMUNITY CARE FACILITY

DESCRIPTION: 
Singing with others is an empowering experience that unites individuals, offers a sense of belonging and enhances their cultural, social and personal identity. As an individual or group activity, singing can lift people out of their depression and take them beyond any mental or physical disability. This is particularly true at the Zahalon Geriatric Center, a community day care center serving elderly people with mental and physical disabilities in Jaffa, Israel. 
       
The Zahalon Geriatric Center provides music therapy services to three groups: patients with Alzheimer’s, patients who are bedridden (also called “tshushim”), and “normal” elders who live independently in the community and visit the Center a few times a week for social, therapeutic and learning purposes. One of the most successful projects at the Center, to date, has been a music therapy program with elderly individuals living in Jaffa. This group consists of twenty people, mostly women, age seventy and up, who arrived in Israel prior to its independence and took part in building the country. Most individuals in the group come from low socio-economic neighborhoods. All have good expressive language; however some are illiterate and suffer from various health issues such as physical disabilities and depression.

Music therapy sessions are offered by a trained music therapist, once a week, for one hour. Overarching goals are to improve self confidence, strengthen daily coping skills, enhance overall mood and bring joy and fulfillment. Sessions begin with an improvisation on various percussion instruments. Next, the music therapist facilitates a group singing experience in which members sing a variety of old and familiar songs that are meaningful for them. During a discussion following the singing, group members share childhood memories as well as national and personal issues related to peace and security in the region, family and health. Special attention is given to songs concerning group member’s love for Israel and the strong connection to their country. By singing these songs together, each individual gains a sense of empowerment and belonging that sustains them outside of the music therapy group and into their communities.

CURRENT STATUS:
The community music therapy program at Zahalon Geriatric Center is funded by the day care center in Zahalon Geriatric Center, and has been active for two years. Since more people expressed an interest in participating in this project, a second group is planned to open within the next month. 

The Center hopes to expand this program to other cities in Israel and create similar groups in other community centers. It strives to deepen the awareness of music therapy in Israel, to demonstrate the importance and effectiveness of music therapy for the elderly and to have more music therapists working with this population in the future.

The community music therapy program at Zahalon Geriatric Center has continuous contact with the music therapy program at Bar Ilan University. For the past ten years, students from Bar Ilan have been doing their internship in Zahalon.

 

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION:
Zahalon Geriatric Center currently utilizes informal evaluation procedures to assess its program. An ongoing dialogue with participants following the sessions reveals that participants enjoy playing and singing together and that being in the group contributes to feelings of belonging and social empowerment. Their life force is also enhanced; each group member learns how to support and take care of others while also receiving the same support.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization Name: Zahalon Geriatric Center
Address: Zahalon Geriatric Center, 100 Jerusalem Boulevard, Jaffa, Israel
Phone: 9723 5133437
Contact Person:  Nurit Shtruzman, Music Therapist
Email:  nuritte@gmail.com


SECTIONS:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
Music for Working with Trauma Survivors
clefCOUNTRY:
Jordan
PROJECT:

MUSIC THERAPY WITH THE IRAQI REFUGEE POPULATION

DESCRIPTION:
Through a gift from the Noor-Hussein Foundation, The Institute for Family Health Music Therapy Program provided music therapy services to the Iraqi refugee population in Amman, Jordan. All clients that participated in the project were registered refugees with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Many clients had experienced trauma, either first-hand or second-hand and some were torture survivors. Clients suffered from a range of issues such as sexual abuse, suicidal feelings, multiple disabilities, emotional trauma, fractured family situations, and behavioral problems. The populations treated included entire family units, children, and adults.

Specific music therapy strategies for the population include processing emotional trauma, decreasing negative behaviors, providing a safe space to express current issues, increase positive social interaction, to increase social integration and to increase communication skills. Techniques used include instrumental and vocal improvisation, songwriting, lyrics analysis, music and imagery, music and art and music-assisted relaxation. A mix of Arabic and western musical idioms were used. The improvisation with the younger children focused on the Arabic scale while the older children’s music ranged from Arabic scales to popular western idioms. 

CURRENT STATUS:
The focus of the project changed in January 2010 to provide group sessions with adults and adolescents.  There were four groups of adults: men with depression (trauma victims), women in domestic abuse situations, young men who were all unaccompanied minors and another group of adolescents with varying diagnoses. It is especially important to note that there have been zero client withdrawals within the last six months of consistent music therapy services. 

Therapists also provided educational sessions about music therapy to the staff at the Institute.
Currently, a German music therapist has been hired by the National Music Conservatory (part of Noor-Hussein Foundation) to continue group sessions with adults.  Funding was approved by the UNHCR for 2010 and will be up for evaluation in the Fall of 2010. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
There is no website or any articles written up about this project at this time.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: National Music Conservatory
Phone: (267) 297-4498
Contact Person: Julie R. Anto, MCAT, MT-BC, Instructor in Music Therapy
Email: Julie.mtx@gmail.com


SECTION:
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRY:
New Zealand

PROJECT:
MUSIC THERAPY SERVICES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: THE RAUKATAURI MUSIC THERAPY CENTRE

DESCRIPTION:
The Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre (RMTC) is New Zealand’s only music therapy centre dedicated to providing music therapy to children and young people from ages 0 to 21 that have special needs. Disability and trauma affect people regardless of ethnicity. Therapists work with clients of various cultures including Maori and Pacific Island. The clients come from all socio-economic backgrounds and have a range of social, physical and emotional needs and difficulties that they face each day. Individual and small group music therapy is provided at the Centre and in outreach projects at a variety of schools and institutions within the greater Auckland region. Over 100 clients receive music therapy each week.

The inspiration for the Centre came when well-known singer-songwriter Hinewehi Mohi, her husband George, and daughter Hineraukatauri, who has severe cerebral palsy and has spent time at the Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy Centre in London in 1999. It was soon evident that therapy through music struck a chord for Hineraukatauri. Most important for Hineraukatauri, music became a means of communicating. Upon their return to New Zealand, the family was determined to establish a music therapy centre. The dream was realised with the opening of the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre in Auckland in 2004.

Music therapy at RMTC is client-centred and goal-oriented, with the focus on the creative relationship and communication that develops between client and therapist. Individualised goals are established by the therapist in consultation with the family and child.

Each child experiences music improvised uniquely with and for them. They interact and communicate musically, expressing themselves in whatever ways they can – using their body, voice or musical instruments. This approach focuses on the client’s strengths, which can make the experience a particularly engaging and motivating one. The client is supported by the therapist to explore the communicative potential of their music making.

Outreach music therapy programmes are currently established in special schools, mainstream schools and kindergartens delivering music therapy to children and young people with special needs. Therapists work alongside teachers and other professionals to achieve the best outcomes for each client.

More recently, the outreach projects have expanded the client base to working with adults in the community. A group of men, aged between 40 and 76, were released four years ago from a residential institution for people with an intellectual disability, and where they had lived since infancy. The music therapy group addresses the emotional and relational needs of the group members using an improvisational approach. Early evaluation has shown a positive response by the group members.

CURRENT STATUS:
The Centre is a nonprofit charitable trust that does not receive statutory funding and is primarily supported through fundraising efforts. The RMTC is a treatment centre that offers:

  • Clinical services on-site to children and young people from 0-21 years
  • Outreach music therapy programmes in education and community services within the Auckland region
  • Placement options for student music therapists
  • Dissemination of information to general public, parents, educators and other professionals through workshop programmes and presentations

The RMTC is currently involved in a funded research project to improve practice in the area of collaborative goal setting and review.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
www.rmtc.org.nz

Publications:
Bagley, M., Molyneux, C., Scoones, R. & Travaglia, R. (2010). Building secure foundations: Music Therapy with Pre-Schoolers. Poster presented at Infant, Toddler & Preschool Mental Health Conference, Auckland, New Zealand 18th – 20th February 2010.

Cooper, A. & Molyneux, C. (2009). Singing the same tune? Co-therapy to support clients experiencing a change of music therapist. The New Zealand Journal of Music Therapy, 7, 32 – 60.

Cooper, A., Bagley, M., Bailey, A., Choi, H-C., Gang, N-H., & Molyneux, C. (2009). The First Five Years: Celebrating the Growth of the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre. Poster presented at the Nordic Music Therapy Conference, Aalborg, Denmark. 30th April – 3rd May 2009.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre
Address: 15 Surrey Crescent, Grey Lynn, Auckland 1021, New Zealand
Phone:  0064 9 360 0889; Fax: 0064 9 360 0887    
Email: info@rmtc.org.nz


SECTIONS: 
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRIES: 
Multi-National: Canada, Switzerland, United States of America
PROJECT: 

EMPOWERING INDIVIDUALS AND COMMUNITIES THROUGH GROUP IMPROVISATION: MUSIC FOR PEOPLE

 Please Refer to SECTION I, PAGE 68


SECTIONS:
Music for Sustainable Community Development
Music for Mental and Physical Health
clefCOUNTRIES:
Guinea and United States of America
PROJECT:

SUPPORTING AND ENHANCING THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF HOMELESS CHILDREN AND CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: GROUP LAIENGEE PROJECT

DESCRIPTION:
Group Laiengee’s performance practice centers on the approach that music and movement allow individuals to feel comfortable and confident to express themselves, to experience a wider range of emotions, and to discover what it is like to engage in communication with others in a rewarding and memorable group relationship. The students are able to gain a sense of success and offer value to their community by playing traditional rhythms, singing familiar songs, and showcasing their feats of dance and music mastery. In spite of their numerous disabilities, they can reenter their society with honor, respect, and accomplishment.

The theory behind Group Laiengee’s approach is that all human beings have an innate responsiveness to music similar to that of the infant and the sound of its mother. This natural instinct remains intact even with the challenges in life brought on by physical, cognitive, or emotional disability. Musicality is a basic human characteristic in all cultures, and a binding element in the socialization of a community.

The project was enhanced through the partnership of Lansana Camara and the Sidney Lanier School, a public school for children with disabilities in Gainesville, Florida. Networking between the two programs provides support to the local musicians and artists who teach and care for the children in Guinea and enhances the music education and cultural experiences of the students in Gainesville, Florida. The Sidney Lanier School used internet cameras and a speaker phone in Conakry to link the two ensembles so they could perform for one another. Using a portion of the Sidney Lanier School’s music budget, instruments made by Group Laiengee and their instructors were purchased and shipped to Gainesville, Florida. The funds were then used to help support housing and food needs for Group Lainegee in Conakry.

Meeting the goals of this project are based on a three-stage method:

Stage One:
The leasing of a home in Conakry for the purpose of providing the musicians and children in the ensemble (some of the children are homeless) with a stable place to live. Stage one has been accomplished through the $5,000 Jubilation Foundation Fellowship award won by Lansana Camara, workshops at public schools, Florida Music Educators Association conferences, and local performances. The musicians and children have a home just outside of Conakry with a gate for safety and space to grow crops that supplement the purchase of rice as a food staple.

Stage Two:
The purchase of a van to transport the children to Conakry for performances in the downtown area which raises their status level in the society as well as providing small increases in their ability to support themselves. Once the vans are purchased, the ensemble can travel outside of Conakry to generate support and demonstrate their ability to transcend their challenges through the arts throughout Guinea.

Stage Three:
The leasing of a building in downtown Conakry that can be used as a school and a shop for the participants to sell their handmade instruments. These include koras (African harp) and balofones. The sale of instruments to tourists and the local residents in Conakry would go far toward sustainability and making the project self-sufficient.

CURRENT STATUS:
This project has met with success and could be replicated in other areas of Guinea and Africa. The goal of leasing a home in Conakry was successful. Through the assistance of the Chicago Arts Orchestra and a fundraising project being organized through the Sidney Lanier School, the stage-two goal of purchasing vans is under way. A second fundraiser involves an event at the Sidney Lanier School to raise the funds for renting the Centre Culturel Franco-Guinéen (C.C.F.G.) theater in Conakry for an evening performance of Group Laiengee. This performance would demonstrate the ability of the children to transcend their challenges by performing in the most famous theatre in Conakry. Ticket sales would generate funds to support the ensemble’s goal of purchasing vans.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
http://www.oncoursesystems.com/school/webpage.aspx?id=24619&xpage=653994
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_D5S1FJ3os
http://www.oncoursesystems.com/school/webpage.aspx?id=24619&xpage=692019

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Organization: Sidney Lanier Center
Address: 312 NW 16th Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601
Phone: 352-262-6533; Fax: 352-955-6885
Contact Persons: Dr. Donald DeVito; Email: devitodr@gm.sbac.edu
Lansana Camara; Email: tasanacamara@gmail.com





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